Online shoppers favor white sellers in classified ads, study finds

Online shoppers favor white sellers in classified ads, study finds Online classified ad shoppers respond less often and offer lower prices when a seller is black rather than white, finds a newly published study based on a field experiment. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Nov. 25, 2013 — If you walked into a store to buy a brand-new Apple iPod, would you be less likely to buy it, or want to pay less for it, if it were presented by a salesperson who was black rather than white?Transpose that shopping experience to Craigslist, and that sums up how the average American behaves, according to newly published research co-authored by University of Virginia professor Jennifer Doleac.A yearlong experiment selling iPods in about 1,200 online classified ads placed in more than 300 locales throughout the United States, ranging from small towns to major cities, tested for such racial bias among buyers by featuring photographs of the iPod held by a man’s hand that was either dark-skinned (“black”), light-skinned (“white”), or light-skinned with a wrist tattoo. In all other respects, the photos were very similar.The experiment, conducted from March 2009 to March 2010, found that black sellers did worse than white sellers on a variety of metrics: they receive 13 percent fewer responses, 18 percent fewer offers, and offers that are 11 to 12 percent lower. These effects are similar in magnitude to those associated with a white seller’s display of a tattoo, which the authors included to serve as a “suspicious” white control group.Buyers corresponding with a black seller also behave in ways suggesting they trust the seller less: they are 17 percent less likely to include their names, 44 percent less likely to agree to a proposed delivery by mail and 56 percent more likely to express concern about making a long-distance payment.“We were really struck to find as much racial discrimination as we did,” said Doleac, assistant professor of public policy and economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, who co-authored the paper with Luke C.D. Stein, assistant professor of finance at Arizona State University’s W.P. Carey School of Business. Stein and Doleac conducted the experiment while both were doctoral students in economics at Stanford University.Their paper, “The Visible Hand: Race and Online Market Outcomes,” was published online Thursday by The Economic Journal of the Royal Economic Society.At the time the ads were placed, among the 300-plus local ad sites, the average market had 15.7 other advertisements for iPod Nanos that had been listed in the previous week. Just 18 percent of the experiment’s ads were posted in markets with at least 20 other advertisements.In those thicker markets with at least 20 other iPod ads, black sellers received the same number of offers and equal best offers relative to whites. Conversely, black sellers suffered particularly poor outcomes in thin markets with fewer buyers and sellers, where they received 23 percent fewer offers and best offers that were 12 percent lower – very similar to the results for the tattooed sellers’ ads.Furthermore, black sellers do worst in markets with high property crime rates and more racially segregated housing, suggesting that at least part of the explanation is “statistical discrimination” – that is, where race is used as a proxy for unobservable negative characteristics, such as more time or potential danger involved in the transaction, or the possibility that the iPod may be stolen – rather than simply “taste-based” discrimination (against race itself), Doleac explained. However, “it is also possible that animus against black sellers is higher in high-crime or high-isolation markets.”The authors also found evidence that black sellers do better in markets with larger black populations, “suggesting that the disparities may be driven, in part, by buyers’ preference for own-race sellers,” they write in the conclusion.The experiment ads all featured a silver, 8-gigabyte “current model” iPod nano digital media player, described as new in an unopened box, and for sale because the seller did not need it.Doleac and Stein never met with the buyers in person. … For more info: Online shoppers favor white sellers in classified ads, study finds ScienceDaily: Living Well News Online shoppers favor white sellers in classified ads, study finds L’articolo Online shoppers favor white sellers in classified ads, study finds sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Confronting the lung cancer stigma

Confronting the lung cancer stigma via Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center: By Andrew Davison I lost my dad to lung cancer. Thirteen years later, I was diagnosed with the same illness that took his life. The difference was that he smoked two packs of cigarettes day, and I did not. While I did smoke occasionally in my early 20s, I have been active and healthy for most of my life. But whether a person smokes or not shouldn’t matter in how we approach lung cancer patients. Through my lung cancer treatment journey, I’ve learned we need to end the stigma surrounding lung cancer. My lung cancer diagnosisAlmost four months ago, I was riding on top of the world, literally. In the midst of a five-hour mountain bike ride at a ski resort in Colorado, I crashed. I was a little banged up and went in to get checked out. After a few stitches and a chest x-ray, I was cleared to go home with a bag of ice and some ibuprofen. Two hours later, while grilling at a summer BBQ, I missed a call from the clinic. The doctor left a voicemail saying that, after a second review, the radiologist had noticed a spot on the upper apex of my left lung. He said it was probably nothing, perhaps even just some scar tissue, and that I should schedule a CT scan. I turned to my wife and said, “There is no way that is good news.” I called my primary physician the next day. I pleaded to get a CT scan ordered and scheduled. The next day, the physician’s assistant informed me there was in fact an indeterminate mass, but that it was nothing to worry about. She said that given that I was young and healthy, did not smoke and maintained a regular fitness routine, it was most likely a false positive. Two days later, a biopsy, pneumothorax and test results revealed a positive diagnosis for stage 1 lung cancer. I was stunned. Lung cancer, of all things? I use my lungs regularly at high altitude and high intensity. They work fine. Lung cancer stigma for nonsmokersBy the second day, I had already become familiar with the ubiquitous question: “Did you smoke?” It is a logical question. We all know smoking causes lung cancer. But when people ask this, it brings up a range of emotions from resignation to annoyance. Sometimes I find myself getting defensive of the three years I did smoke. It was part of the culture. Besides, that was more than 25 years ago. And, though my doctors don’t know exactly what caused my lung cancer — Secondhand smoke exposure? Some other toxins? Something else? — they say those few years I smoked probably were not a factor. Other times I feel compelled to educate my listener about the increasing numbers of nonsmokers who contract lung cancer. Sometimes I gently remind my listener no one deserves an awful disease with low survival rates and tremendous suffering, even if he or she made poor choices in the past. When my dad received his lung cancer diagnosis, I was emotionally devastated. However, if I am honest, my response mimicked the party line, “Well, I am not surprised. After all, you smoked two-plus packs a day for 57 years.” His lung cancer battle lasted 14 months. It was a hard road from surgery through chemotherapy. I helped him through the entire process, and amidst the hardships, our relationship deepened and evolved. The reality is that lung cancer is a mass murderer on a global scale. According to the American Cancer Society, 13 percent of lung cancers are unrelated to smoking. Even with my family history, I knew relatively little about this pernicious disease until recently. Like millions of others, I believed that lung cancer only affected smokers. Changing the stigma surrounding lung cancerDoes it really matter if you smoked, were exposed to secondhand smoke, worked with toxins, lived in a radon house or randomly inhaled the wrong particles? Is anyone really in a position to claim that someone really deserves lung cancer? No, of course not. We need to change the way the world looks at lung cancer. We need to build programs around awareness and educate the public, invest more money in research detection and therapies as well as support the promotion of healthy lifestyles and prevention. It is time for lung cancer to become as relevant in our culture as breast cancer. It is time to end the stigma. It is time for change. Lung cancer is one of the cancers MD Anderson is focusing on as part of our Moon Shots Program to dramatically reduce cancer deaths. Learn more about our Lung Cancer Moon Shot. For more info: Confronting the lung cancer stigma Cancerwise | Cancer blog from MD Anderson Cancer Center Confronting the lung cancer stigma L’articolo Confronting the lung cancer stigma sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Junk food, poor oral health increase risk of premature heart disease

Junk food, poor oral health increase risk of premature heart disease The association between poor oral health and increased risk of cardiovascular disease should make the reduction of sugars such as those contained in junk food, particularly fizzy drinks, an important health policy target, say experts. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Dec. 2, 2013 — The association between poor oral health and increased risk of cardiovascular disease should make the reduction of sugars such as those contained in junk food, particularly fizzy drinks, an important health policy target, say experts writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.Share This:Poor oral hygiene and excess sugar consumption can lead to periodontal disease where the supporting bone around the teeth is destroyed. It is thought that chronic infection from gum disease can trigger an inflammatory response that leads to heart disease through a process called atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. Despite convincing evidence linking poor oral health to premature heart disease, the most recent UK national guidance on the prevention of CVD at population level mentions the reduction of sugar only indirectly.Dr Ahmed Rashid, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, who co-wrote the paper, said: “As well as having high levels of fats and salt, junk foods often contain a great deal of sugar and the effect this has on oral health may be an important additional mechanism by which junk food elevates risk of CVD.” He added: “Among different types of junk food, soft drinks have raised particular concerns and are the main source of free sugar for many individuals.”The authors refer to the well-publicized New York ‘soda ban’ controversy which has brought the issue to the attention of many. Yet, they point out, in the UK fizzy drinks remain commonly available in public areas ranging from hospitals to schools. Dr Rashid said: “The UK population should be encouraged to reduce fizzy drink intake and improve oral hygiene. Reducing sugar consumption and managing dental problems early could help prevent heart problems later in life.”Share this story on Facebook, Twitter, and Google:Other social bookmarking and sharing tools:|Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by SAGE Publications, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above. Journal Reference:A. … For more info: Junk food, poor oral health increase risk of premature heart disease ScienceDaily: Top Health News Junk food, poor oral health increase risk of premature heart disease L’articolo Junk food, poor oral health increase risk of premature heart disease sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Il primo cinema con le cinture di sicurezza

La Norwegian Public Roads Administration ha voluto portare l’attenzione su tutti coloro che non fanno uso delle cinture di sicurezza durante la guida. In occasione del lancio di "Fast & Furious 6" (Giugno 2013) tutte le poltrone di un cinema sono state dotate di cintura di sicurezza, prima dell’inizio del film sul maxischermo è stato proiettato un messaggio "Allacciare le cinture! il film non inizierà fino a che non l’avrete fatto", detto, fatto, dopo che tutti i presenti hanno fatto questo gesto, il film è iniziato. addthis_url = ‘http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bloguerrilla.it%2F…L’articolo Il primo cinema con le cinture di sicurezza sembra essere il primo su Marketing.

Medical research needs kids, two-thirds of parents unaware of opportunities

Medical research needs kids, two-thirds of parents unaware of opportunities To improve healthcare for children, medical research that involves kids is a must. Yet, only five percent of parents say their children have ever participated in any type of medical research. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Nov. 26, 2013 — To improve healthcare for children, medical research that involves kids is a must. Yet, only five percent of parents say their children have ever participated in any type of medical research, according to a new University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health.However, in this month’s poll, nearly one-half of parents said they are willing to have their children take part in research that involved testing a new medicine or a new vaccine, if their child had the disease being studied. More than three-quarters of parents are willing to have their children participate in research involving questions about mental health, eating or nutrition.The poll surveyed 1,420 parents with a child aged 0 to 17 years old, from across the United States.According to the poll, parents who are aware of medical research opportunities are more likely to have their children take part. But awareness is an issue: more than two-thirds of those polled indicated that they have never seen or heard about opportunities for children to participate in medical research.”Children have a better chance of living healthier lives because of vaccinations, new medications and new diagnostic tests. But we wouldn’t have those tools without medical research,” says Matthew M. Davis, M.D., M.A.P.P., director of the National Poll on Children’s Health and professor of pediatrics and internal medicine in the University of Michigan Health System.”With this poll, we wanted to understand parents’ willingness to allow their children to participate in medical research. The good news is that willingness is far higher than the current level of actual engagement in research. This means there is great opportunity for the medical research community to reach out to families and encourage them to take part in improving medical care.”In the poll, the willingness to have children take part differed by the type of study — higher for studies involving questions related to nutrition and mental illness; lower for studies involving exposure to a new medicine or vaccine.The poll found that 43 percent of parents were willing to have their children participate in a study testing a new vaccine and 49 percent testing a new medicine. … For more info: Medical research needs kids, two-thirds of parents unaware of opportunities ScienceDaily: Living Well News Medical research needs kids, two-thirds of parents unaware of opportunities L’articolo Medical research needs kids, two-thirds of parents unaware of opportunities sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Public health data to help fight deadly contagious diseases

Public health data to help fight deadly contagious diseases In an unprecedented windfall for public access to health data, researchers have digitized all weekly surveillance reports for reportable diseases in the US going back 125 years. Supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, the project’s goal is to aid in the eradication of devastating diseases. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Nov. 27, 2013 — In an unprecedented windfall for public access to health data, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health researchers have collected and digitized all weekly surveillance reports for reportable diseases in the United States going back more than 125 years.The easily searchable database, described in the Nov. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, is free and publicly available. Supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the project’s goal is to aid scientists and public health officials in the eradication of deadly and devastating diseases.”Using this database, we estimate that more than 100 million cases of serious childhood contagious diseases have been prevented, thanks to the introduction of vaccines,” said lead author Willem G. van Panhuis, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of epidemiology at Pitt Public Health. “But we also are able to see a resurgence of some of these diseases in the past several decades as people forget how devastating they can be and start refusing vaccines.”Despite the availability of a pertussis vaccine since the 1920s, the largest pertussis epidemic in the U.S. since 1959 occurred last year. Measles, mumps and rubella outbreaks also have reoccurred since the early 1980s.”Analyzing historical epidemiological data can reveal patterns that help us understand how infectious diseases spread and what interventions have been most effective,” said Irene Eckstrand, Ph.D., of NIH, which partially funded the research through its Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study. “This new work shows the value of using computational methods to study historical data — in this case, to show the impact of vaccination in reducing the burden of infectious diseases over the past century.””We are very excited about the release of the database,” said Steven Buchsbaum, deputy director, Discovery and Translational Sciences, for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. “We anticipate this will not only prove to be an invaluable tool permitting researchers around the globe to develop, test and validate epidemiological models, but also has the potential to serve as a model for how other organizations could make similar sets of critical public health data more broadly, publicly available.”The digitized dataset is dubbed Project TychoTM, for 16th century Danish nobleman Tycho Brahe, whose meticulous astronomical observations enabled Johannes Kepler to derive the laws of planetary motion.”Tycho Brahe’s data were essential to Kepler’s discovery of the laws of planetary motion,” said senior author Donald S. … For more info: Public health data to help fight deadly contagious diseases ScienceDaily: Top Health News Public health data to help fight deadly contagious diseases L’articolo Public health data to help fight deadly contagious diseases sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Unhappy meals? Majority of very young children in California eat fast food at least once per week

Unhappy meals? Majority of very young children in California eat fast food at least once per week A surprisingly large percentage of very young children in California, including 70 percent of Latino children, eat fast food regularly, according to a new policy brief. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Nov. 26, 2013 — A surprisingly large percentage of very young children in California, including 70 percent of Latino children, eat fast food regularly, according to a new policy brief by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.The study found that 60 percent of all children between the ages of 2 and 5 had eaten fast food at least once in the previous week.The majority of the state’s young children also do not eat enough fruits and vegetables, with only 57 percent of parents reporting that their child ate at least five fruit and vegetable servings the previous day.”A weekly happy meal is an unhappy solution, especially for toddlers,” said Susan Holtby, the study’s lead author and a senior researcher at the Public Health Institute. “Hard-working, busy parents need support to make healthy food selections for their kids.”The new study used data from several cycles of the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) to examine dietary behaviors of very young children, including their consumption of fast food, sugar-sweetened beverages, fruits and vegetables, and to gauge how much influence parents have over what their children eat.The study’s authors found that in both 2007 and 2009, about two-thirds of children between the ages of 2 and 5 ate at least one fast food meal during the previous week, and 29 percent ate two or more. About 10 percent of children in this age group ate three or more fast food meals the previous week.Although this and previous studies by the center have noted a general decline in the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among children in California, that positive trend is reversed when linked to fast food. Specifically, the study’s authors found that children who ate two to three fast-food meals a week were much more likely to drink soda than those who ate less fast food.”Fast food combined with drinking soda at such a young age can set these kids up for obesity-related health problems,” Holtby said.Other key findings from the study:Asian children eat the fewest fruits and vegetables — Defying the stereotype of the vegetable-rich Asian diet, Asian children were found to eat the fewest fruits and vegetables of any group — only 40 percent ate at least five servings of fruits and vegetables each day, compared with 56 percent of all the state’s children.Poverty and influence — Parents living in the poorest households — those below 100 percent of the federal poverty level — were less likely than parents in all other income groups to say they have “a lot” of influence over what their children eat.Simple solutions – The authors noted that the data can help identify communities that may benefit from targeted messages about healthy eating and could help promote programs and policies that support parents in offering healthier options to their very young children. For example, an educational campaign to encourage parents to swap fruit juice for actual fruit would go far in reducing unnecessary sugar and increasing fiber and other nutrients, the authors noted.”Simple messages and programs can reinforce what every parent wants — the good health of their children,” said Camille Maben, executive director of First 5 California, which funded the study. “This shows there is more work to be done to reach families with the critical education and support they need.”Read the policy brief, “Majority of Young Children in California Eat Fast Food Regularly but Drink Less Soda” here: http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/publications/search/pages/detail.aspx?PubID=1236 For more info: Unhappy meals? Majority of very young children in California eat fast food at least once per week ScienceDaily: Living Well News Unhappy meals? Majority of very young children in California eat fast food at least once per week L’articolo Unhappy meals? Majority of very young children in California eat fast food at least once per week sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Lowering three risk factors could cut obesity-related risk of heart disease by more than half

Lowering three risk factors could cut obesity-related risk of heart disease by more than half Controlling blood pressure, serum cholesterol, and blood glucose may substantially reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke associated with being overweight or obese. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Nov. 21, 2013 — Controlling blood pressure, serum cholesterol, and blood glucose may substantially reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke associated with being overweight or obese, according to a study from a worldwide research consortium led by a team from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), Imperial College London, and the University of Sydney. Among the three factors, high blood pressure was found to pose the biggest risk for heart disease, and an even bigger risk for stroke, among overweight or obese participants.”Our results show that the harmful effects of overweight and obesity on heart disease and stroke partly occur by increasing blood pressure, serum cholesterol and blood glucose. Therefore, if we control these risk factors, for example through better diagnosis and treatment of hypertension, we can prevent some of the harmful effects of overweight and obesity,” said senior author Goodarz Danaei, HSPH assistant professor of global health.The study appears online November 22, 2013 in The Lancet.Worldwide, obesity has nearly doubled since 1980, according to a previous study by the research team, and more than 1.4 billion adults aged 20 and older are overweight or obese. Health consequences of overweight and obesity include heart disease and stroke — the leading causes of death worldwide — diabetes, and several types of cancer. The researchers had also previously estimated that 3.4 million annual deaths are due to overweight and obesity.While previous research had indicated that blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar all increase the risk of heart attack and stroke in people who are overweight or obese, this new study — a pooled analysis of 97 prospective studies from around the world that enrolled 1.8 million participants — provides a comprehensive and definitive look by considering blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose separately and together and in different parts of the world.The researchers looked at these three factors because they are likely pathways through which obesity increases the risk of heart disease and stroke and because they are of interest to physicians and public health agencies. They found that high blood pressure, serum cholesterol, and blood glucose explain up to half of the increased risk of heart disease and three quarters of the increased risk of stroke among overweight or obese participants. High blood pressure poses the biggest risk of the three metabolic factors examined. It accounted for 31% of the increased risk of heart disease and 65% of the increased risk of stroke among overweight or obese individuals.Majid Ezzati, a co-author and professor of global environmental health, Imperial College London, and adjunct professor of global health at HSPH, said: “Controlling hypertension, cholesterol, and diabetes will be an essential but partial and temporary response to the obesity epidemic. As we use these effective tools, we need to find creative approaches that can curb and reverse the global obesity epidemic.” For more info: Lowering three risk factors could cut obesity-related risk of heart disease by more than half ScienceDaily: Living Well News Lowering three risk factors could cut obesity-related risk of heart disease by more than half L’articolo Lowering three risk factors could cut obesity-related risk of heart disease by more than half sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Nut consumption linked to reduced death rate, study suggests

Nut consumption linked to reduced death rate, study suggests In the largest study of its kind, people who ate a daily handful of nuts were 20 percent less likely to die from any cause over a 30-year period than were those who didn’t consume nuts, say scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Harvard School of Public Health via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Nov. 20, 2013 — In the largest study of its kind, people who ate a daily handful of nuts were 20 percent less likely to die from any cause over a 30-year period than were those who didn’t consume nuts, say scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Harvard School of Public Health.Their report, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, contains further good news. The regular nut-eaters were found to be more slender than those who didn’t eat nuts, a finding that should alleviate the widespread worry that eating a lot of nuts will lead to overweight.The report also looked at the protective effect on specific causes of death.”The most obvious benefit was a reduction of 29 percent in deaths from heart disease — the major killer of people in America,” said Charles S. Fuchs, MD, MPH, director of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Center at Dana-Farber, who is the senior author of the report. “But we also saw a significant reduction — 11 percent — in the risk of dying from cancer,” added Fuchs, who is also affiliated with the Channing Division of Network Medicine at Brigham and Women’s.Whether any specific type or types of nuts were crucial to the protective effect couldn’t be determined. However, the reduction in mortality was similar both for peanuts and for “tree nuts” — walnuts, hazelnuts, almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, macadamias, pecans, cashews, pistachios and pine nuts.Several previous studies have found an association between increasing nut consumption and a lower risk of diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, colon cancer, gallstones, and diverticulitis. Higher nut consumption also has been linked to reductions in cholesterol levels, oxidative stress, inflammation, adiposity, and insulin resistance. Some small studies have linked increased nuts in the diet to lower total mortality in specific populations. But no previous research studies had looked in such detail at various levels of nut consumption and their effects on overall mortality in a large population that was followed for over 30 years.For the new research, the scientists were able to tap databases from two well-known ongoing observational studies that collect data on diet and other lifestyle factors and various health outcomes. The Nurses’ Health Study provided data on 76,464 women between 1980 and 2010, and the Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study yielded data on 42,498 men from 1986 to 2010. … For more info: Nut consumption linked to reduced death rate, study suggests ScienceDaily: Living Well News Nut consumption linked to reduced death rate, study suggests L’articolo Nut consumption linked to reduced death rate, study suggests sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Quantifying Earth’s worth to public health

Quantifying Earth’s worth to public health A new paper delineates a new branch of environmental health that focuses on the public health risks of human-caused changes to Earth’s natural systems. via ScienceDaily: Ecology News: Nov. 19, 2013 — A new paper from members of the HEAL (Health & Ecosystems: Analysis of Linkages) consortium delineates a new branch of environmental health that focuses on the public health risks of human-caused changes to Earth’s natural systems.Looking comprehensively at available research to date, the paper’s authors highlight repeated correlations between changes in natural systems and existing and potential human health outcomes, including:Forest fires used to clear land in Indonesia generate airborne particulates that are linked to cardiopulmonary disease in downwind population centers like Singapore. Risk of human exposure to Chagas disease in Panama and the Brazilian Amazon, and to Lyme disease in the United States, is positively correlated with reduced mammalian diversity. When households in rural Madagascar are unable to harvest wild meat for consumption, their children can experience a 30% higher risk of iron deficiency anemia — a condition that increases the risk for sickness and death from infectious disease, and reduces IQ and the lifelong capacity for physical activity. In Belize, nutrient enrichment from agricultural runoff hundreds of miles upstream causes a change in the vegetation pattern of lowland wetlands that favors more efficient malaria vectors, leading to increased malaria exposure among coastal populations. Human health impacts of anthropogenic climate change include exposure to heat stress, air pollution, infectious disease, respiratory allergens, and natural hazards as well as increased water scarcity, food insecurity and population displacement. “Human activity is affecting nearly all of Earth’s natural systems — altering the planet’s land cover, rivers and oceans, climate, and the full range of complex ecological relationships and biogeochemical cycles that have long sustained life on Earth,” said Dr. Samuel Myers of the Harvard School of Public Health and the study’s lead author. “Defining a new epoch, the Anthropocene, these changes and their effects put in question the ability of the planet to provide for a human population now exceeding 7 billion with an exponentially growing demand for goods and services.”In their paper, the authors demonstrate the far reaching effects of this little explored and increasingly critical focus on ecological change and public health by illustrating what is known, identifying gaps for and limitations of future research efforts, addressing the scale of the global burden of disease associated with changes to natural systems, and proposing a research framework that strengthens the scientific underpinnings of both public health and environmental conservation. Such efforts should lead to a more robust understanding of the human health impacts of accelerating environmental change and inform decision-making in the land-use planning, conservation, and public health policy realms. … For more info: Quantifying Earth’s worth to public health ScienceDaily: Ecology News Quantifying Earth’s worth to public health L’articolo Quantifying Earth’s worth to public health sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

A happy patient is well connected to a doctor

A happy patient is well connected to a doctor The happiest patients are those who have regular contact with their doctors. A study finds that patients who have established “continuity of care” with primary-care physician are most satisfied with their treatment. The study comes as the American health care system moves to a more team-based approach to care, known as patient-centered medical home. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Nov. 18, 2013 — A new trend in American health care is the patient-centered medical home. The approach revolves around a team of medical and health professionals who, working together, treat an individual, led by a primary-care physician who orchestrates the whole effort. The goal is the team knows everything about the patient, no matter how disparate the symptoms — from the earache last night to the long history of high cholesterol — and works together to treat the individual in a holistic way.Patient-centered medical homes (PCMH) have gained popularity since the National Committee on Quality Assurance recognized them five years ago. There are more than 1,500 such practices recognized by the nonprofit health quality association.Yet despite their growing popularity, questions remain about their effectiveness. In a new study, researchers at the University of Iowa evaluated a similar model being tested with military veterans, and conclude that maintaining a direct, regular channel of communication between the patient and the primary doctor is critical to success.”This is a time of intense change in health care, and all of these aspects (with PCMHs) potentially contribute to more fragmentation,” says David Katz, associate professor in internal medicine at the UI and the corresponding author on the study, published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. “That’s why we can’t lose sight of the doctor-patient relationship, and how we’re communicating with our physicians.”Katz and his colleagues surveyed 4,393 veterans receiving care in medical facilities in the upper Midwest run by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to evaluate their thoughts on the VA’s Patient Aligned Care Team initiative, an approach to care much like the PCMH. The veterans needed to have at least three primary-care visits during the survey period, which lasted from 2009 to 2010.In particular, the researchers sought to better understand whether continuity of care — measured by the concentration of visits with a primary-care physician and the duration of care with that physician — led to a patient feeling more satisfied with his or her relationship with the primary doctor.The research team found that it did, mainly because continuity of care seems to yield better communication between the individual and the primary-care doctor and thus a happier patient overall.”I think that’s a very simple implication of this study,” Katz says, “in the sense that it can improve the connectedness of the patient and improve the quality of the doctor-patient communication and the patient’s satisfaction with their care.”The researchers found that the surveyed VA patients reported seeing their assigned care provider 80 percent of the time, higher than anticipated and comparable with rates in the private sector. Yet only half rated as “excellent” their involvement with a primary physician in making a treatment decision in the past year.Katz noted that several factors could influence the rating, such as if a patient had an acute problem that needed immediate treatment, reducing the time available for an involved discussion. … For more info: A happy patient is well connected to a doctor ScienceDaily: Living Well News A happy patient is well connected to a doctor L’articolo A happy patient is well connected to a doctor sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Brain activity in severely brain injured patients who ‘wake up’ with sleeping pill: Other patients may also respond

Brain activity in severely brain injured patients who ‘wake up’ with sleeping pill: Other patients may also respond George Melendez has been called a medical miracle. After a near drowning deprived his brain of oxygen, Melendez remained in a fitful, minimally conscious state until his mother, in 2002, decided to give him the sleep aid drug Ambien to quiet his moaning and writhing. The next thing she knew, her son was quietly looking at her and trying to talk. He has been using the drug ever since to maintain awareness, but no one could understand why Ambien led to such an awakening. via ScienceDaily: Top Science News: Nov. 20, 2013 — George Melendez has been called a medical miracle. After a near drowning deprived his brain of oxygen, Melendez remained in a fitful, minimally conscious state until his mother, in 2002, decided to give him the sleep aid drug Ambien to quiet his moaning and writhing. The next thing she knew, her son was quietly looking at her and trying to talk. He has been using the drug ever since to maintain awareness, but no one could understand why Ambien led to such an awakening.Now, a team of scientists led by Weill Cornell Medical College has discovered a signature of brain activity in Melendez and two other similarly “awakened” patients they say explain why he and others regain some consciousness after using Ambien or other drugs or treatments. The pattern of activity, reported Nov. 19 in the journal eLife, was identified by analyzing the common electroencephalography (EEG) test, which tracks brain waves.”We found a surprisingly consistent picture of electrical activity in all three patients before they receive the drug. Most interesting is that their specific pattern of activity suggests a particular process occurring in the brain cells of the cerebral cortex and also supports the role of a crucial brain circuit,” says the study’s senior investigator, Dr. Nicholas Schiff, the Jerold B. Katz Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience and professor of public health at Weill Cornell. … For more info: Brain activity in severely brain injured patients who ‘wake up’ with sleeping pill: Other patients may also respond ScienceDaily: Top Science News Brain activity in severely brain injured patients who ‘wake up’ with sleeping pill: Other patients may also respond L’articolo Brain activity in severely brain injured patients who ‘wake up’ with sleeping pill: Other patients may also respond sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Genome scale view of great white shark uncovers unexpected and distinctive features

Genome scale view of great white shark uncovers unexpected and distinctive features A new study undertakes the first large-scale exploration of the great white shark’s genetic repertoire, and comes up with unexpected findings. via ScienceDaily: Top Science News: Nov. 19, 2013 — The great white shark, a major apex predator made famous by the movie “Jaws,” is one of the world’s most iconic species capturing an extraordinary amount of public fascination. An intriguing question is what makes a white shark so distinctive? One way to address this is to explore the genetic makeup of this remarkable animal.A new study by scientists from Nova Southeastern University’s (NSU) Save Our Seas Shark Research Centre and Cornell University published in final form today in the journal BMC Genomics now undertakes the first large-scale exploration of the great white shark’s genetic repertoire, and comes up with unexpected findings.The researchers compared the transcriptome (i.e., the set of RNA sequences expressed by the organism’s genes) from the white shark heart to the transcriptomes from the best studied fish research model (the zebrafish) and humans to look for similarities and significant differences that might explain the distinctiveness of the white shark. So they had a common comparative base, the researchers compared gene products that had known functions in all three species.Contrary to expectations, the researchers found that the proportion of white shark gene products associated with metabolism had fewer differences from humans than zebrafish (a bony fish) — an unexpected result given that bony fishes are evolutionarily much more closely related to sharks.Indeed, more broadly speaking, the researchers were also surprised to find that other aspects of the white shark heart transcriptome, including molecular functions as well as the cellular locations of these functions, also showed greater similarity to human than zebrafish. Like many first looks at complex scientific questions, the unexpected results of this study raises more questions than provides answers.”It’s intriguing why there are these fewer differences in the proportion of gene products between white sharks and humans, than white sharks and zebrafish, when the complete opposite was expected based on evolutionary affinities,” said study co-author Mahmood Shivji, director of NSU’s Save Our Seas Shark Research Center and Guy Harvey Research Institute. “One possibility for the apparent greater similarity between white sharks and humans in the proportion of gene products associated with metabolism might be due partly to the fact that the white shark has a higher metabolism because it is not a true cold-blooded fish like bony fishes; however this explanation remains a hypothesis to be further tested.”One of the notable biological properties of white sharks is that it is one of few fishes that is regionally warm-bodied, i.e., parts of its body (its viscera, locomotor muscles and cranium) are kept at a higher temperature than the surrounding water world — a property known as regional endothermy. This warm-body property is in turn associated with elevated metabolic rates compared to true cold-blooded bony fishes.”Additional comparative data from other white shark tissues and/or from other endothermic shark species such as makos would be required to see if this general similarity in gene products holds,” said Michael Stanhope of Cornell, who co-led the study with Shivji. “Nevertheless, this preliminary finding opens the possibility that some aspects of white shark metabolism, as well as other aspects of its overall biochemistry, might be more similar to that of a mammal than to that of a bony fish.”Another curious feature of the genetic repertoire of the white shark heart was that the transcriptome revealed a much lower abundance of a certain type of DNA sequence that occurs in repeated triplet form, than found in other vertebrates. Interestingly, in human genes that contain such repeated triplet sequences, an aberrant increase in their number has been linked to a variety of neurological disorders. … For more info: Genome scale view of great white shark uncovers unexpected and distinctive features ScienceDaily: Top Science News Genome scale view of great white shark uncovers unexpected and distinctive features L’articolo Genome scale view of great white shark uncovers unexpected and distinctive features sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

In pandemic, parents who get reminders more likely to get kids vaccinated

In pandemic, parents who get reminders more likely to get kids vaccinated A new study found that the state immunization registry — the public health database that tracks vaccinations — can be an effective tool to encourage influenza vaccinations during a pandemic. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Nov. 18, 2013 — A new University of Michigan study found that the state immunization registry — the public health database that tracks vaccinations- can be an effective tool to encourage influenza vaccinations during a pandemic.U-M researchers collaborated with the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) to evaluate a statewide influenza vaccination reminder campaign conducted using the Michigan Care Improvement Registry (MCIR) during the H1N1 pandemic during 2009-10. The study results were published Nov. 14 in the American Journal of Public Health.Reminder letters were mailed to parents of children with chronic health conditions such as asthma or diabetes, who had not yet received the vaccine that was recommended during the 2009-10 H1N1 pandemic. The letter explained that children with chronic conditions were at increased risk for complications from H1N1 influenza and that parents should contact the child’s health care provider or local health department to make an appointment for vaccination.Vaccination rates were higher for children whose parents were sent a reminder letter compared to children without chronic conditions who were not sent reminders.Early in the 2009-10 pandemic, reports from the CDC indicated that pediatric influenza deaths were more common among children with one or more chronic condition, heightening the importance of influenza vaccination among this priority group.”Immunization registries like MCIR are important public health tools. This study shows the value of using immunization registries to prompt parents of children with a chronic condition to get that child vaccinated,” says Kevin Dombkowski, Research Associate Professor with the University of Michigan’s Child Health Evaluation and Research (CHEAR) Unit.”This is an important illustration of public health preparedness,” says Dombkowski, who was the lead author of the study.Dombkowski says that the Michigan Department of Community Health has invested significant amounts of time and resources to establish and maintain MCIR, which is one of the best immunization registries in the country.”MDCH officials recognized the importance of being able to identify these high-risk kids in the event of a severe influenza season, so as a consequence, MCIR was ready when the H1N1 pandemic hit in 2009,” he says. “All kids 6 months and older should receive flu vaccine each season, but those with chronic conditions are considered priority cases during pandemics or times of vaccine shortages.”In 2005, MDCH began using administrative claims from the state’s Medicaid program to identify children with chronic health conditions. This unique approach makes Michigan a national leader in this type of proactive approach to protecting children at high risk for influenza-related complications, Dombkowski says. “It’s a model that most other states could follow.” For more info: In pandemic, parents who get reminders more likely to get kids vaccinated ScienceDaily: Top Health News In pandemic, parents who get reminders more likely to get kids vaccinated L’articolo In pandemic, parents who get reminders more likely to get kids vaccinated sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Early stages breast cancer could soon be diagnosed from blood samples

Early stages breast cancer could soon be diagnosed from blood samples A new blood test for the early detection of breast cancer was shown in preliminary studies to successfully identify the presence of breast cancer cells from serum biomarkers. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Nov. 14, 2013 — What could someday be the first blood test for the early detection of breast cancer was shown in preliminary studies to successfully identify the presence of breast cancer cells from serum biomarkers, say the Houston Methodist Research Institute scientists who are developing the technology.With a New York University Cancer Institute colleague, the researchers report in an upcoming Clinical Chemistry (now online) that the mixture of free-floating blood proteins created by the enzyme carboxypeptidase N accurately predicted the presence of early-stage breast cancer tissue in mice and in a small population of human patients.”In this paper we link the catalytic activity of carboxypeptidase N to tumor progression in clinical samples from breast cancer patients and a breast cancer animal model,” said biomedical engineer Tony Hu, Ph.D., who led the project. “Our results indicate that circulating peptides generated by CPN can serve as clear signatures of early disease onset and progression.”The technology is not yet available to the public, and may not be for years. More extensive clinical tests are needed, and those tests are expected to begin in early 2014.There are currently no inexpensive laboratory tests for the early detection of breast cancer, providing the impetus for researchers around the world to invent them.”What we are trying to create is a non-invasive test that profiles what’s going on at a tissue site without having to do a biopsy or costly imaging,” Hu said. “We think this could be better for patients and — if we are successful — a lot cheaper than the technology that exists. While there’s more to the cost of administering a test than materials alone, right now those materials only cost about $10 per test.”CPN is an enzyme that modifies proteins after the proteins are first created. Past studies have only shown the enzyme is more active in lung cancer patients. The present report in Clinical Chemistry is the first to show CPN isn’t merely more active in breast cancer patients, but there’s more of it.The technology being developed by Hu’s group combines nanotechnology and advanced mass spectrometry to separate and detect extremely low levels of small proteins (peptides) created by CPN. These peptides are believed to originate in or near cancerous cells, eventually making their way into the bloodstream.In animal models and human biopsies, Hu’s group first determined the presence of breast cancer tissue, characterized each sample’s stage of development, and looked at how much CPN was being expressed. Blood samples were also taken from each individual.Blood serum proteins were separated on a nanoporous silica chip dotted with four nanometer holes, which captured and isolated smaller proteins for spectrographic analysis. … For more info: Early stages breast cancer could soon be diagnosed from blood samples ScienceDaily: Living Well News Early stages breast cancer could soon be diagnosed from blood samples L’articolo Early stages breast cancer could soon be diagnosed from blood samples sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Alcohol ads in US magazines still expose consumers to risky content, messages

Alcohol ads in US magazines still expose consumers to risky content, messages A new report calls into question whether existing American federal and voluntary standards for alcohol advertisements curtail potentially damaging content and protect public health. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Nov. 14, 2013 — A new report from the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth (CAMY) at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health calls into question whether existing federal and voluntary standards for alcohol advertisements curtail potentially damaging content and protect public health.The researchers examined nearly 1,800 different ads for beer, spirits and alcopops that appeared between 2008 and 2010 in national magazines; they found that while the ads largely adhered to existing regulations and codes, numerous adherent ads still contained content promoting unhealthy and problematic consumption. Examples include ads showing scantily clad, objectified and sexualized women, and ads associating alcoholic beverages with active lifestyles and weight control. The report is published in the American Journal of Public Health.”Considering advertising’s demonstrated power to shape behavior, it’s important that the public health community be knowledgeable about alcohol advertising content, particularly when it reaches underage audiences,” said study author Katherine C. Smith, associate professor with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “Our findings suggest further limitations and enhanced federal oversight may be necessary to protect public health.”Alcohol is heavily marketed in the United States: Alcohol companies spend at least $4 billion a year on promotion; an estimated $847 million was spent on magazine advertising alone from 2008 to 2010. At least 14 studies have found that the more young people are exposed to alcohol advertising and marketing, the more likely they are to drink, or if they are already drinking, to drink more.Federal regulation of alcohol advertising and marketing is minimal. Marketers may not make false claims that are intended to deceive, and they cannot include statements judged indecent or which make health or curative claims. In addition to federal limits, marketing is also governed by a system of self-regulation under the Beer Institute and the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States, both of whose codes emphasize responsible practices on the part of alcohol producers.”The devil is in the details when it comes to regulation, and there are currently very few details as to what constitutes unacceptable practices regarding alcohol advertising,” said study author and CAMY director David Jernigan, also an associate professor with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “When we see time and time again examples of problematic ads that comply with existing regulations and industry standards, we must ask ourselves what more can be done to protect the public’s health.”The study authors likened alcohol industry self-regulation to what happened when regulation of tobacco advertising was left up to that industry.”As seen with tobacco, self-regulation permits an industry to frame approaches as credible when they may actually work against the overall health and well-being of the public,” Smith said.In 2003, the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine recommended that alcohol companies take “reasonable precautions” to reduce youth exposure to alcohol advertising.”Given the clear difficulties with regulating content, tightening guidelines about when and where companies may place their ads would also help protect youth from problematic alcohol advertising,” Jernigan said.Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused drug among youth in the United States, and is responsible for more than 4,700 annual deaths among underage youth. For more info: Alcohol ads in US magazines still expose consumers to risky content, messages ScienceDaily: Living Well News Alcohol ads in US magazines still expose consumers to risky content, messages L’articolo Alcohol ads in US magazines still expose consumers to risky content, messages sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Guerrilla Marketing Spreads Jury Truth

Juror rights activists have started a nationwide campaign to educate the public about our rights if selected for jury duty. http://juryrightsproject.com/ Sta…L’articolo Guerrilla Marketing Spreads Jury Truth sembra essere il primo su Marketing.

Google invita il Made in Italy a sfruttare le possibilità offerte dal web

Google invita il Made in Italy a sfruttare le possibilità offerte dal web Firenze, 8 novembre 2013 – Google vuole aiutare le imprese italiane a digitalizzarsi per promuovere i prodotti del Made in Italy nel mondo, attraverso l’e-commerce ed il web. E’ la piattaforma per la promozione del Made Italy, e dei suoi settori chiave, lanciata dal Festival dell’Intelligenza Collettiva dal direttore della Comunicazione e Public Affairs per l’Europa,il Medio Oriente e l’Africa di Google Peter Barron. “Ci sono delle barriere fra la vecchia economia e la nuova economia – ha spiegato Barron – Google vuole mirare proprio a far crollare queste …L’articolo Google invita il Made in Italy a sfruttare le possibilità offerte dal web sembra essere il primo su Made In Italy.

Prosthetic hands viewed as eerie by the public, new study shows

Prosthetic hands viewed as eerie by the public, new study shows Members of the public would prefer to look at human hands or robotic hands rather than prosthetic hands which they view as eerie, a new study has shown. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Nov. 12, 2013 — Members of the public would prefer to look at human hands or robotic hands rather than prosthetic hands which they view as eerie, a new study by The University of Manchester has shown.But prosthetic hands which looked more human-like were rated as less eerie, the academics found.Researchers hope their study, published in the Journal Perception, and future work in this area will help improve designs for prosthetic limbs.Earlier research has shown that people find robots that look as close to being human more uncomfortable than those which are clearly not human. But this research has focused on faces or whole bodies.The University of Manchester study explored the theory with hands. 43 right-handed participants, 36 female and seven male, viewed a series of photographs of human, robotic and prosthetic hands and graded them on a nine-point scale in terms of eeriness or human-likeness.They found prosthetic hands generally received the highest eeriness ratings and were rated as more human like than the mechanical hands. But prosthetic hands which looked more human-like were rated as less eerie.Dr Ellen Poliakoff, based in the University’s School of Psychological Science who led the research, now plans to carry out further experiments. Dr Poliakoff said: “Our findings show hands are viewed in a similar way to previous experiments which have looked at faces and bodies.”Finding out more about this phenomenon, known as the uncanny valley, may help with the design of prosthetic limbs.”Dr Emma Gowen, based in the University’s Faculty of Life Science who also worked on the research, added: “We hope this and further research will allow us to learn more about social perception and what is special about perceiving another human being. Determining what factors contribute to eeriness can help us to understand how we interpret and respond to other people.” For more info: Prosthetic hands viewed as eerie by the public, new study shows ScienceDaily: Top Health News Prosthetic hands viewed as eerie by the public, new study shows L’articolo Prosthetic hands viewed as eerie by the public, new study shows sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Gene speeds kidney disease progression, failure in blacks, regardless of diabetes status

Gene speeds kidney disease progression, failure in blacks, regardless of diabetes status A large study found that African Americans with the APOL1 gene variant experience faster progression of chronic kidney disease and have a significantly increased risk of kidney failure, regardless of their diabetes status. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Nov. 11, 2013 — A large study co-led by Penn Medicine published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine found that African Americans with the APOL1 gene variant experience faster progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and have a significantly increased risk of kidney failure, regardless of their diabetes status.The findings, published in conjunction with a presentation at the American Society of Nephrology annual meeting, come from the two largest prospective National Institutes of Health-funded study cohorts of nearly 5,000 individuals with kidney disease: the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) and the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study.Those studies involve institutions from across the country, including the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, which houses the Scientific and Data Coordinating Center (SDCC) for the CRIC study, led by Harold I. Feldman, MD, MSCE who also chairs the study’s national Steering Committee.Dr. Feldman, director of Penn’s Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (CCEB) and chair of its Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (DBE) and Amanda H. Anderson, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of Epidemiology in the DBE, are co-authors.Past studies have found that APOL1 risk variants are associated with a 40 percent increased risk of CKD in African Americans compared to whites. Many, however, focused on people without diabetes. And for those that did focus on diabetes, the findings were inconsistent.”This was a surprising finding for the group that helps answer another big piece of the puzzle,” said Anderson. “In previous literature, there has been more of a definitive picture of blacks without diabetes, but here we demonstrated that APOL1 gene variants also play a role in the development of kidney failure in those with diabetes.” Such information helps researchers better understand why African-Americans are four times more likely to develop kidney failure than whites, regardless of the cause of failure.It also helps explain, in part, the faster progression toward kidney failure observed in blacks with CKD, she added.In the AASK study, which enrolled only African Americans, kidney failure occurred in 58 percent of participants in the APOL1 risk group and 37 percent in the APOL1 non-risk group. In the CRIC study, kidney function decline was greater among African Americans in the APOL1 risk group, but it was similar among African Americans in the APOL1 non-risk group and European Americans.The findings provide direct evidence that African Americans with established CKD have a faster kidney function decline and increased rates of kidney failure compared with whites, and that APOL1risk variants increase CKD progression in African Americans.Senior authors include researchers from University of Maryland School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public and Georgetown University of School of Medicine.”Knowing the role of these variants may lead to screening tests and new preventive measures for those at risk, such as earlier treatment,” said Anderson. For more info: Gene speeds kidney disease progression, failure in blacks, regardless of diabetes status ScienceDaily: Top Health News Gene speeds kidney disease progression, failure in blacks, regardless of diabetes status L’articolo Gene speeds kidney disease progression, failure in blacks, regardless of diabetes status sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Buffet dish sequences may prompt healthier choices

Buffet dish sequences may prompt healthier choices Most people are unaware that food order biases what ends up on their plates: the first food in line is taken the most and biases what else is taken. This influence is so strong that in one study researchers found that two-thirds of an individual’s plate is filled with the first three items they encounter, thus food order can be leveraged to encourage selection and intake of healthier foods. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Nov. 6, 2013 — Every day millions of people stand in line at all-you-can-to-eat buffet lines waiting to satiate their palates with the delicious foods on the line. Most of these people, however, are unaware that food order biases what ends up on their plates: the first food in line is taken the most and biases what else is taken. In fact, this influence is so strong that in a recent study published in Public Library of Science One, Drs. Brian Wansink and Andrew Hanks found that two-thirds of an individual’s plate is filled with the first items they encounter. Plus, when less healthy foods are served first, individuals take 31% more total food items.Share This:Drs. Wansink and Hanks conducted their study at a conference where attendees were served a seven-item breakfast buffet. In the dining area, the food items were served on two separate tables just over 50 feet apart. Unbeknownst to the attendees, foods were arranged in opposite order on the two lines. On one line, cheesy eggs, fried potatoes, bacon, cinnamon rolls, low-fat granola, low-fat yogurt, and fruit were served in that exact order. … For more info: Buffet dish sequences may prompt healthier choices ScienceDaily: Living Well News Buffet dish sequences may prompt healthier choices L’articolo Buffet dish sequences may prompt healthier choices sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Earliest record of copulating insects discovered

Earliest record of copulating insects discovered Scientists have found the oldest fossil depicting copulating insects in northeastern China. via ScienceDaily: Top Science News: Nov. 6, 2013 — Scientists have found the oldest fossil depicting copulating insects in northeastern China, published November 6th in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dong Ren and colleagues at the Capital Normal University in China.Share This:Fossil records of mating insects are fairly sparse, and therefore our current knowledge of mating position and genitalia orientation in the early stages of evolution is rather limited.In this study, the authors present a fossil of a pair of copulating froghoppers, a type of small insect that hops from plant to plant much like tiny frogs. The well-preserved fossil of these two froghoppers showed belly-to-belly mating position and depicts the male reproductive organ inserting into the female copulatory structure.This is the earliest record of copulating insects to date, and suggests that froghoppers’ genital symmetry and mating position have remained static for over 165 million years. Ren adds, “We found these two very rare copulating froghoppers which provide a glimpse of interesting insect behavior and important data to understand their mating position and genitalia orientation during the Middle Jurassic.”Share this story on Facebook, Twitter, and Google:Other social bookmarking and sharing tools:|Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above. Journal Reference:Shu Li, Chungkun Shih, Chen Wang, Hong Pang, Dong Ren. Forever Love: The Hitherto Earliest Record of Copulating Insects from the Middle Jurassic of China. PLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (11): e78188 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0078188 Need to cite this story in your essay, paper, or report? Use one of the following formats: APA MLA Note: If no author is given, the source is cited instead. For more info: Earliest record of copulating insects discovered ScienceDaily: Top Science News Earliest record of copulating insects discovered L’articolo Earliest record of copulating insects discovered sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Lower education levels linked to unhealthy diets

Lower education levels linked to unhealthy diets People with lower levels of education may eat larger amounts of unhealthy, calorically dense food than those with a higher education level, possibly because they are more physically active. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Nov. 6, 2013 — People with lower levels of education may eat larger amounts of unhealthy, calorically dense food than those with a higher education level, possibly because they are more physically active, according to new research published November 6th in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, by Jonas Finger and colleagues at the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin, Germany.Share This:Studies consistently show that unhealthy diets are seen more often in people of lower socioeconomic status, a term based on factors such as education level, income level, and occupation. Overall physical activity, however, may also be related to socioeconomic status and dietary habits.In this study, the authors used a large-scale survey approach to investigate the relationship between education level, food consumption, and physical activity. They analyzed a large database from a representative German adult population and found that German adults with a low level of education consumed more sugar- and fat-rich foods than adults with a high education level. They also consumed fewer fruits and vegetables than those with higher education levels.They next analyzed how physically active each group was, which is related to how much energy they used. They found that adults of lower socioeconomic status were more physically active and expended more energy than those of higher socioeconomic status. These results suggest that the higher energy expenditure in this group may explain their higher consumption of sugar- and fat-rich foods.Share this story on Facebook, Twitter, and Google:Other social bookmarking and sharing tools:|Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above. Journal Reference:Jonas D. … For more info: Lower education levels linked to unhealthy diets ScienceDaily: Living Well News Lower education levels linked to unhealthy diets L’articolo Lower education levels linked to unhealthy diets sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

‘Culture of resistance’ for self-reporting concussions in youth sports

‘Culture of resistance’ for self-reporting concussions in youth sports Young athletes in the US face a “culture of resistance” to reporting when they might have a concussion and to complying with treatment plans, which could endanger their well-being, says a new report. The report provides a broad examination of concussions in a variety of youth sports with athletes aged five to 21. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Oct. 30, 2013 — Young athletes in the U.S. face a “culture of resistance” to reporting when they might have a concussion and to complying with treatment plans, which could endanger their well-being, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. The report provides a broad examination of concussions in a variety of youth sports with athletes aged 5 to 21. Overall, reported concussions rates are more frequent among high school athletes than college athletes in some sports — including football, men’s lacrosse and soccer, and baseball; higher for competition than practice (except for cheerleading); and highest in football, ice hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, soccer, and women’s basketball. Concussion rates also appear higher for youths with a history of prior concussions and among female athletes.Although the committee that wrote the report examined useful scientific information to inform its study, it discovered that research about youth concussions is limited. To address these gaps in knowledge, the committee identified several areas for further research, including establishing a national surveillance system to accurately determine the number of sports-related concussions, identifying changes in the brain following concussions in youth, conducting studies to assess the consequences and effects of concussions over a life span, and evaluating the effectiveness of sports rules and playing practices in reducing concussions.”The findings of our report justify the concerns about sports concussions in young people,” said Robert Graham, chair of the committee and director of the national program office for Aligning Forces for Quality at George Washington University, Washington, D.C. “However, there are numerous areas in which we need more and better data. Until we have that information, we urge parents, schools, athletic departments, and the public to examine carefully what we do know, as with any decision regarding risk, so they can make more informed decisions about young athletes playing sports.”The committee found little evidence that current sports helmet designs reduce the risk of concussions. It stressed that properly fitted helmets, face masks, and mouth guards should still be used, because they reduce the risk of other injuries — such as skull fractures; bleeding inside the skull; and injuries to the eyes, face, and mouth. … For more info: ‘Culture of resistance’ for self-reporting concussions in youth sports ScienceDaily: Living Well News ‘Culture of resistance’ for self-reporting concussions in youth sports L’articolo ‘Culture of resistance’ for self-reporting concussions in youth sports sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

How poverty molds the brain: Poor neural processing of sound linked to lower maternal education background

How poverty molds the brain: Poor neural processing of sound linked to lower maternal education background Groundbreaking research nearly two decades ago linking a mother’s educational background to her children’s literacy and cognitive abilities stands out among decades of social science studies demonstrating the adverse effects of poverty. Now new research has taken that finding in a neuroscientific direction: linking poor processing of auditory information in the adolescent brain to a lower maternal educational background. via ScienceDaily: Top Science News: Oct. 29, 2013 — Groundbreaking research nearly two decades ago linking a mother’s educational background to her children’s literacy and cognitive abilities stands out among decades of social science studies demonstrating the adverse effects of poverty.Now new research conducted at Northwestern University has taken that finding in a neuroscientific direction: linking poor processing of auditory information in the adolescent brain to a lower maternal educational background.”These adolescents had noisier neural activity than their classmates, even when no sound was presented,” said Nina Kraus, the Hugh Knowles Professor of Neurobiology, Physiology and Communication Sciences at Northwestern and corresponding author of the study.In addition, the neural response to speech for the adolescents from a lower maternal educational background was erratic over repeated stimulation, with lower fidelity to the incoming sound.”Think about the neural noise like static in a radio — with the announcer’s voice coming in faintly,” Kraus said.Maternal education acted as a proxy for socioeconomic status for the study. Adolescents were divided into two groups, according to whether their mothers had a high school education or less or had completed some post-secondary schooling.Not only did the adolescents from a lower maternal educational background have neural responses to speech sounds that were nosier, more variable and represented the input signal weakly, but their performances on tests of reading and working memory also were poorer.”The impoverished brain: Disparities in maternal education affect the neural response to sound” will be published Oct. 30 in the Journal of Neuroscience. Its authors are Erika Skoe, assistant professor of speech, language and hearing sciences at the University of Connecticut; Jennifer Krizman, a doctoral student in Northwestern’s Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory; and Kraus, also the director of the Auditory Neuroscience Lab.This study builds on evidence that children from low-income families experience a type of auditory impoverishment. The landmark study by Hart and Risley (1995) revealed that children in high-income families are exposed to 30 million more words than children from families on welfare. This reduction in the quality and quantity of language input, along with greater exposure to unstructured sound such as ambient noise, may be affecting how the brain represents auditory information.In urban populations, income and amount of noise exposure are known to be correlated. Consistent with the idea that noisy auditory environments increase neural noise, the new Journal of Neuroscience study found that the adolescents from the lower maternal educational group have increased neural activity in the absence of sound input.According to the study, “Neural models indicate that when the input to a neuron is noisier, the firing rate becomes more variable, ultimately limiting the amount of sensory information that can be transmitted.””If your brain is creating a different signal each time you hear a sound, you might be losing some of the details of the sound,” said Skoe, lead author of the study. “Losing these details may create challenges in the classroom and other noisy settings.”The new research conducted at Northwestern contributes to a recent wave of neuroscientific research demonstrating that sociocultural factors influence brain structure and function.Another recently published study from the Kraus lab showed that inconsistent neural responses to sounds relate to poor reading but that by acoustically augmenting the classroom, neural responses became more stable.”Modifying the auditory world for a particular student, even if just for a portion of the day, may improve academic performance and fine-tune how sound is automatically encoded in the brain,” Skoe said.Ongoing work in Northwestern’s Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory is investigating whether auditory enrichment in the form of music education and other school-based activities can offset the negative impact of an impoverished acoustic environment.For the new study, brain activity of Chicago Public School adolescents, almost all ninth-graders, was assessed both in response to and in the absence of auditory input. The nervous system’s responses to speech sounds were observed through passive electrophysiological recordings, with students grouped according to the highest educational level achieved by their mothers.The responses reflect activity from a communication hub within the central nervous system that provides a snapshot of sensory, cognitive and reward circuits that are engaged to process sound. … For more info: How poverty molds the brain: Poor neural processing of sound linked to lower maternal education background ScienceDaily: Top Science News How poverty molds the brain: Poor neural processing of sound linked to lower maternal education background L’articolo How poverty molds the brain: Poor neural processing of sound linked to lower maternal education background sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Women working in Head Start programs report poor physical, mental health

Women working in Head Start programs report poor physical, mental health Women working in Head Start, the nation’s largest federally funded early childhood education program, report higher than expected levels of physical and mental health problems. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Oct. 31, 2013 — Women working in Head Start, the nation’s largest federally funded early childhood education program which serves nearly one million low-income children, report higher than expected levels of physical and mental health problems, according to researchers at Temple University. Their findings are reported in the first-ever survey conducted on the health of Head Start staff.In a paper published October 31 in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease, the Temple researchers, led by Robert Whitaker, professor of public health and pediatrics, reported that:• Six physical health conditions — obesity, asthma, high blood pressure, diabetes or prediabetes, severe headache or migraine, and lower back pain — were each between 19-35 percent more common in Head Start staff than in the comparable U.S. population;• 24 percent of the staff suffered from significant depressive symptoms — enough to be diagnosed with depression;• 28 percent reported that their physical or mental health was “not good” on half or more of the 30 days prior to the survey;• 15 percent rated their overall health as either “fair or poor;” and• 9 percent were absent from work 10 or more days in the last year due to illness.The work of Head Start staff can be very emotionally demanding as they help children and families living in poverty who face multiple social risks, noted the researchers. Staff members also work for low pay, with teachers’ salaries well below those of public school kindergarten teachers. One teacher who participated in the survey summarized her situation by writing, “My job is why I’m stressed all the time and my personal health suffers. I chose a demanding job, but the pay is bare minimum and isn’t enough to get by.”The Temple researchers conducted an anonymous, online survey of staff working in 66 Pennsylvania Head Start programs. Of those who participated in the survey, the researchers focused on 2,122 female respondents, which included managers and classroom teachers of three and four year olds, as well as those making home visits to families of infants and toddlers participating in Early Head Start. The survey results were compared with previous national health surveys involving a large number of women whose social and demographic characteristics matched those in the Head Start survey.”In the 50 years that the Head Start program has been in existence, many studies have reported on the health of the children and families,” said Whitaker. “However, no study has ever examined the health of the staff, which is the group on which the program relies to achieve its goals. … For more info: Women working in Head Start programs report poor physical, mental health ScienceDaily: Living Well News Women working in Head Start programs report poor physical, mental health L’articolo Women working in Head Start programs report poor physical, mental health sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Getting Past The Health Insurance Plan Cancellation Hysteria

Getting Past The Health Insurance Plan Cancellation Hysteria Much has been said recently about how the ACA is causing a tidal wave of policy cancellations, and resulting in people losing coverage that they would prefer to keep.  The frustrating part about this – as has generally been the case with every big uproar about the ACA – is that we’re not really getting Related posts: Past Averages Do Not Predict the Future More Flexibility With An Individual Health Insurance Plan Public Health Insurance Plan Deserves A Chance via Colorado Health Insurance Insider: For more info: Getting Past The Health Insurance Plan Cancellation Hysteria Colorado Health Insurance Insider Getting Past The Health Insurance Plan Cancellation Hysteria L’articolo Getting Past The Health Insurance Plan Cancellation Hysteria sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Public insurance fills health coverage gap

Public insurance fills health coverage gap In the years leading up to implementation of the Affordable Care Act, the percentage of Californians who received their health insurance through public programs continued to rise, likely in direct response to the loss of job-based coverage in the state. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Oct. 30, 2013 — In the years leading up to implementation of the Affordable Care Act, the percentage of Californians who received their health insurance through public programs continued to rise, likely in direct response to the loss of job-based coverage in the state, according to a new analysis by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.The data for the analysis, collected in 2012 by the California Health Interview Survey, represents the most recent comprehensive statewide source of information on health insurance trends. The fact sheet was funded by The California Endowment and The California Wellness Foundation.According to the analysis, the percentage of non-elderly state residents receiving health insurance through an employer dipped just below 50 percent in 2011 and remained there in 2012 — a 6 percentage-point decrease since 2001.Public programs, such as Medi-Cal and Healthy Families, insured nearly 20 percent of Californians in 2012, a 3 percentage-point increase since 2009 and a 5 percentage-point increase since 2001.”In effect, public programs have stepped in as employers have stepped out,” said Shana Alex Lavarreda, the center’s director of health insurance studies and the lead author on the fact sheet. “The data refutes any lingering arguments that employer-based insurance is the solution to our health care coverage crisis.”Jobs that are returning to the state after the Great Recession seem to lack affordable health insurance benefits, depriving workers of a major source of coverage. From 2009 to 2012, the proportion of Californians with employment-based insurance dropped from 52.1 percent to 49.5 percent. With the recent economic recovery, unemployment rates in California have declined, from 20 percent in 2009 to 9.8 percent in 2012. Still, the rate of job-based health insurance has remained below 50 percent of the non-elderly population rather than exhibiting a similar recovery.”The steady decline in employer-based health coverage affirms the need for Obamacare,” said Dr. Robert K. Ross, president and CEO of The California Endowment. “For the first time in history, health coverage is within the reach of many more Californians who aren’t covered by job-based health insurance.””These data make it clear that many Californian families are still struggling financially and will need to access low- or no-cost health coverage,” said Colburn S. … For more info: Public insurance fills health coverage gap ScienceDaily: Living Well News Public insurance fills health coverage gap L’articolo Public insurance fills health coverage gap sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

How poverty molds the brain

How poverty molds the brain Groundbreaking research nearly two decades ago linking a mother’s educational background to her children’s literacy and cognitive abilities stands out among decades of social science studies demonstrating the adverse effects of poverty. Now new research has taken that finding in a neuroscientific direction: linking poor processing of auditory information in the adolescent brain to a lower maternal educational background. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Oct. 29, 2013 — Groundbreaking research nearly two decades ago linking a mother’s educational background to her children’s literacy and cognitive abilities stands out among decades of social science studies demonstrating the adverse effects of poverty.Now new research conducted at Northwestern University has taken that finding in a neuroscientific direction: linking poor processing of auditory information in the adolescent brain to a lower maternal educational background.”These adolescents had noisier neural activity than their classmates, even when no sound was presented,” said Nina Kraus, the Hugh Knowles Professor of Neurobiology, Physiology and Communication Sciences at Northwestern and corresponding author of the study.In addition, the neural response to speech for the adolescents from a lower maternal educational background was erratic over repeated stimulation, with lower fidelity to the incoming sound.”Think about the neural noise like static in a radio — with the announcer’s voice coming in faintly,” Kraus said.Maternal education acted as a proxy for socioeconomic status for the study. Adolescents were divided into two groups, according to whether their mothers had a high school education or less or had completed some post-secondary schooling.Not only did the adolescents from a lower maternal educational background have neural responses to speech sounds that were nosier, more variable and represented the input signal weakly, but their performances on tests of reading and working memory also were poorer.”The impoverished brain: Disparities in maternal education affect the neural response to sound” will be published Oct. 30 in the Journal of Neuroscience. Its authors are Erika Skoe, assistant professor of speech, language and hearing sciences at the University of Connecticut; Jennifer Krizman, a doctoral student in Northwestern’s Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory; and Kraus, also the director of the Auditory Neuroscience Lab.This study builds on evidence that children from low-income families experience a type of auditory impoverishment. The landmark study by Hart and Risley (1995) revealed that children in high-income families are exposed to 30 million more words than children from families on welfare. This reduction in the quality and quantity of language input, along with greater exposure to unstructured sound such as ambient noise, may be affecting how the brain represents auditory information.In urban populations, income and amount of noise exposure are known to be correlated. Consistent with the idea that noisy auditory environments increase neural noise, the new Journal of Neuroscience study found that the adolescents from the lower maternal educational group have increased neural activity in the absence of sound input.According to the study, “Neural models indicate that when the input to a neuron is noisier, the firing rate becomes more variable, ultimately limiting the amount of sensory information that can be transmitted.””If your brain is creating a different signal each time you hear a sound, you might be losing some of the details of the sound,” said Skoe, lead author of the study. “Losing these details may create challenges in the classroom and other noisy settings.”The new research conducted at Northwestern contributes to a recent wave of neuroscientific research demonstrating that sociocultural factors influence brain structure and function.Another recently published study from the Kraus lab showed that inconsistent neural responses to sounds relate to poor reading but that by acoustically augmenting the classroom, neural responses became more stable.”Modifying the auditory world for a particular student, even if just for a portion of the day, may improve academic performance and fine-tune how sound is automatically encoded in the brain,” Skoe said.Ongoing work in Northwestern’s Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory is investigating whether auditory enrichment in the form of music education and other school-based activities can offset the negative impact of an impoverished acoustic environment.For the new study, brain activity of Chicago Public School adolescents, almost all ninth-graders, was assessed both in response to and in the absence of auditory input. The nervous system’s responses to speech sounds were observed through passive electrophysiological recordings, with students grouped according to the highest educational level achieved by their mothers.The responses reflect activity from a communication hub within the central nervous system that provides a snapshot of sensory, cognitive and reward circuits that are engaged to process sound. … For more info: How poverty molds the brain ScienceDaily: Top Health News How poverty molds the brain L’articolo How poverty molds the brain sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Common bias known as ‘endowment effect’ not present in hunter-gatherer societies

Common bias known as ‘endowment effect’ not present in hunter-gatherer societies Psychology and behavioral economics have experimentally identified a laundry list of common biases that cause people to act against their own apparent interests. One of these biases — the mere fact of possessing something raises its value to its owner — is known as the “endowment effect.” A new interdisciplinary study has delved into whether this bias is truly universal, and whether it might have been present in humanity’s evolutionary past. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Oct. 28, 2013 — Centuries of economic theory have been based on one simple premise: when given a choice between two items, people make the rational decision and select the one they value more. But as with many simple premises, this one has a flaw in that it is demonstrably untrue.The fields of psychology and behavioral economics have experimentally identified a laundry list of common biases that cause people to act against their own apparent interests. One of these biases — the mere fact of possessing something raises its value to its owner — is known as the “endowment effect.”A new interdisciplinary study from the University of Pennsylvania has delved into whether this bias is truly universal, and whether it might have been present in humanity’s evolutionary past.The study was led by Coren Apicella, an assistant professor in Penn’s School of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Psychology, and Eduardo Azevedo, an assistant professor in Wharton’s Department of Business Economics and Public Policy. They collaborated with Yale’s Nicholas Christakis and the University of California, San Diego’s James Fowler.It will be published in the American Economic Review.A classic endowment effect experiments involves giving participants one of two items, such as a chocolate bar and a mug, and then asking whether they would like to trade for the other. As the starting item is selected at random, there should be a 50 percent chance that participants initially receive the item they like best and thus a 50 percent chance that they will trade.”What we see, however, is that people trade only about 10 percent of the time,” Azevedo said. “Simply telling someone they own something makes them value it more. That is, the way you ask the question changes what item people prefer, unlike what you would expect from rational economic behavior.”One problem with these experiments is that they generally involve participants from so-called “WEIRD” — western, educated, industrialized, rich and democratic — societies. Apicella drew on her decade-long study of the Hadza people of Tanzania to provide a new perspective. The Hadza are one of the last hunter-gatherer societies on Earth, living in small, nomadic camps that communally share nearly all their possessions.”We wanted to examine whether the endowment effect was something that occurs in non-WEIRD societies, since they represent the vast majority of human populations that have ever existed,” Apicella said. … For more info: Common bias known as ‘endowment effect’ not present in hunter-gatherer societies ScienceDaily: Top Health News Common bias known as ‘endowment effect’ not present in hunter-gatherer societies L’articolo Common bias known as ‘endowment effect’ not present in hunter-gatherer societies sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Should term life insurance be based on your future earnings?

Should term life insurance be based on your future earnings? Planning for your family's financial future can sometimes be difficult. The volatile nature of the stock market and uncertainty about employment can complicate your determination about how much life insurance you may need. It's common for some individuals to purchase a life insurance policy based on how much they think they will earn in the future, but is that really a wise idea? Most financial planners advise that the death benefit of a life insurance policy should be worth 10 to 12 times the insured person's current annual income. If you have a good reason to believe that your income will increase significantly in the future, it's not a bad idea to base your coverage off of that figure. This will allow you to possibly lock in lower rates now than you would be eligible for later. Having an expectation that your income will increase in the future means more than just thinking you'll get a raise or find a better job. In our current economic climate, making such predictions is risky. However, there are a few examples of people who are almost guaranteed to increase their income and would benefit from purchasing a life insurance policy based on future earnings. Medical residents can realistically expect their income to at least double once they are able to practice as physicians. In addition, career public-sector employees who are eligible for promotions based on seniority will usually know what their salary will be five, 10 or 15 years from now, because this information is available to the public. It is important to remember that the purpose of life insurance is to take care of your family in the event that something tragic happens to you. While you want to protect their future financial security, you also don't want your life insurance policy to lapse because you never got that promotion and can't keep up with the payments. When considering how much coverage you need, you should think not only about your current income, but also the following: Educational expenses – This can be a hard thing to predict, especially if your children won't begin college for at least another decade, but you can estimate the cost of this by figuring out the average annual increase in college tuition. Final expenses – At the very least, your family should have enough money to pay for a funeral and burial or cremation. This cost of this can range from $10,000 to $20,000. Mortgage and other debts – Car loans, student loans, credit card bills and other forms of consumer debt can be a burden on survivors. Your life insurance policy should provide enough to pay off these debts entirely. A mortgage, however, may not necessarily need to be paid off, especially if the interest rate is low. For competitive quotes for a term life insurance policy, visit our website to use our convenient online quote engine. Original article: Should term life insurance be based on your future earnings? ©2013 LifeInsure.com. All Rights Reserved. via LifeInsure.com » Insure your Life Blog: For more info: Should term life insurance be based on your future earnings? LifeInsure.com » Insure your Life Blog Should term life insurance be based on your future earnings? L’articolo Should term life insurance be based on your future earnings? sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Survey finds that online bullying has declined

Survey finds that online bullying has declined The results of a new survey were released today, exploring the pervasiveness of digital abuse among teens and young adults, how it is affecting America’s youth and how they’re responding to it. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Oct. 24, 2013 — MTV and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research today released the results of a new survey exploring the pervasiveness of digital abuse among teens and young adults, how it is affecting America’s youth and how they’re responding to it. According to the survey, trends show that the share of young people affected by digital abuse has declined since 2011, with less than half (49 percent) of those surveyed stating that they have experienced digital abuse, compared to 56 percent in 2011. Additionally, virtually every form of digital abuse tracked in this study — 26 out of 27 listed — has declined. When experiencing digital abuse, 44 percent of young people state that they seek help from their parents or family, up over 25 percent from 2011, and the majority (66 percent) say that telling their parents made the situation better.Share This:Sexting is down nearly 20 percent from 2011, with only about a quarter of young people reporting that they have sent or received “sext” messages, compared with one in three in 2011. Meanwhile, just over 10 percent of 14-24 year olds say they have shared naked pictures of videos of themselves. While this number remains relatively consistent over the past few years, the percentage of teens and young adults who say they sent naked pictures to someone they only know online has decreased by more than half since 2009. Additionally, young people report less pressure to send naked pictures or videos of themselves, down over 40 percent compared to 2011 (12 percent vs. 7 percent). Unfortunately there has been less progress on digital dating abuse. … For more info: Survey finds that online bullying has declined ScienceDaily: Living Well News Survey finds that online bullying has declined L’articolo Survey finds that online bullying has declined sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Review of daily aspirin dosage highlights concerns about side effects

Review of daily aspirin dosage highlights concerns about side effects Researchers have published the most comprehensive review of the benefits and risks of a daily dose of prophylactic aspirin and warn that greater understanding of side effects is needed. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Oct. 24, 2013 — Researchers at Warwick Medical School have published the most comprehensive review of the benefits and risks of a daily dose of prophylactic aspirin and warn that greater understanding of side effects is needed.The possible benefits of a daily dose have been promoted as a primary prevention for people who are currently free of, but at risk of developing, cardiovascular disease or colorectal cancer.However, any such benefit needs to be balanced alongside a fuller understanding of the potentially harmful side effects such as bleeding and gastrointestinal problems.The paper, published by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA) Programme, reviews the wealth of available randomised controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews and meta-analyses, allowing the team from Warwick Evidence to quantify those relative benefits and risks.The reported benefits of taking aspirin each day ranged from 10% reduction in major cardiovascular events to a 15% drop in total coronary heart disease. In real terms, that would ultimately mean 33-46 fewer deaths per 100,000 patients taking the treatment.There was also evidence of a reported reduction in incidents of colorectal cancer, which showed from approximately five years after the start of treatment. This would equate to 34 fewer deaths from colorectal cancer per 100,000 patients.The adverse effects of aspirin were also noted with a 37% increase in gastrointestinal bleeding (an extra 68-117 occurrences per 100,000 patients) and between a 32%-38% increase in the likelihood of a haemorrhagic stroke (an extra 8-10 occurrences per 100,000 patients).Aileen Clarke, Professor of Public Health Research and Director of Warwick Evidence at Warwick Medical School, said, “This study looks deeper into the range of research on regular aspirin use than anything before, using more innovative methods, and it makes it clear that there is an incredibly fine balance between the possible benefits and risks of the intervention. We need to be extremely careful about over-promoting aspirin intervention without having first fully understood these negative side effects.”There are a number of ongoing trials that will be completed in the coming six years which may help to clarify this further, including the impact of different dose regimens.” For more info: Review of daily aspirin dosage highlights concerns about side effects ScienceDaily: Living Well News Review of daily aspirin dosage highlights concerns about side effects L’articolo Review of daily aspirin dosage highlights concerns about side effects sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Workers Memorial Day–Remember the Dead, Fight for the Living

Workers Memorial Day–Remember the Dead, Fight for the Living In recognition of Workers Memorial Day 2013, Worthington & Caron would like to acknowledge all of the working men and women who have been hurt, taken ill or have died in pursuit of their piece of the “American Dream”. This, of course, includes hundreds of thousands of workers who have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or asbestosis as a result of exposure to asbestos in the workplace. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was established on April 28, 1971 with the mission of assuring safe and healthful working conditions by setting and enforcing standards and providing training, outreach, education and assistance. The anniversary of this day has been designated Worker’s Memorial Day, a day to honor all men and women who have been injured or have lost their lives due to a workplace accident or exposure. According to the World Health Organization approximately 125 million people in the world were exposed to asbestos at the workplace, and more than 107,000 people die each year from asbestos-related disease. One in every three deaths from occupational cancer is estimated to be caused by asbestos. Even though OSHA established regulations regarding the handling of asbestos in the early 1970s, many manufacturers continued using asbestos in their products for many years–in some cases decades later. The OSHA regulations proved to be of some effect in reducing exposures to existing asbestos that had been installed years earlier and could be marked and cordoned off at jobsites such as factories, refineries and power plants. However, the regulations proved to be less effective in limiting exposures to new products that were used by workers or by others in their presence at jobsites. As disease caused by asbestos typically doesn’t manifest until 20 to 50 or more years after exposure, it is anticipated that the incidence of asbestos disease will remain at its current rate for years to come. Many believe that the conduct of asbestos companies from the 1930s through the 1980s is one of the worst examples of companies placing profits ahead of public safety in our nation’s history. Worker’s Memorial Day is a powerful reminder of the importance of worker health and the need to prevent this situation from ever occurring again. via Mesothelioma Bytes: In recognition of Workers Memorial Day 2013,Worthington & Caronwould like to acknowledge all of the working men and women who have been hurt, taken ill or have died in pursuit of their piece of the “American Dream”. This, of course, includes hundreds of thousands of workers who have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or asbestosis as a result of exposure to asbestos in the workplace.The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was established on April 28, 1971 with the mission of assuring safe and healthful working conditions by setting and enforcing standards and providing training, outreach, education and assistance. The anniversary of this day has been designated Worker’s Memorial Day, a day to honor all men and women who have been injured or have lost their lives … For more info: Workers Memorial Day–Remember the Dead, Fight for the Living Mesothelioma Bytes Workers Memorial Day–Remember the Dead, Fight for the Living L’articolo Workers Memorial Day–Remember the Dead, Fight for the Living sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Mesothelioma and Asbestos

Mesothelioma and Asbestos Asbestos is a fibrous material which has been in use for a long time mainly for its fire resistant qualities. Asbestos is a preferred building material due to its fire resistant and heat resistant capability coupled with the fact that it is not expensive. Asbestos was very popular amongst California business owners in the early and mid 20′s and they used it in nearly every way they could. They tried to use asbestos to create safer, and cheaper buildings, but time has proven that these building are not any safer, nor are they more cheaper,as the high cost of treating the mesothelioma disease that they caused, they also lead to loss of lives. Asbestos was once used in everything from automotive parts, clothing, and blankets. It was a natural choice for fire fighter gear. The asbestos material, looked like it was the absolute safest and most rewarding discovery of the 20th century, with buildings, homes, and businesses less likely to burn to the ground with the use of asbestos. The fact that about 3000 people died annually from Mesothelioma , made people to start to see things differently after some time. Mesothelioma is a direct and profound consequence of long term exposure to asbestos. Asbestos fibers are in fact the only known cause of Mesothelioma. The great tragedy of Mesothelioma is far more insidious than the fact that thousands of people are diagnosed with Mesothelioma every year, but that the knowledge of what asbestos may very well do to the interior of those who were around it regularly has been well known since the 1920s. Mesothelioma is one of the deadliest diseases with a virtual 100% mortality rate.Most cases will die within a year or two. The material that was often used to protect buildings from fire damage affected the internal organs of the people who worked with it, sentencing these hard working Californians early and painful deaths. Asbestos affects slowly the lining of the organs, usually attacking the lining of the lungs. It may take somewhere between 10 and 40 years before the damage from asbestos becomes evident in the form of Mesothelioma. Those who worked with it never felt ill or had any physical warning signs that there was anything wrong. The mortality rate has decreased slightly, as those who are now aware that they worked with asbestos in the past are receiving medical evaluations prior to having symptoms. Unfortunately, many of these individuals are finding their vigilance was warranted. However, with early detection, the survival rate has increased slightly. For so many, early detection was never a possibility. So few companies were willing to inform their employees that they had been exposed to asbestos for fear of being compelled to reach reasonable and fair financial settlements with the victims of Mesothelioma and their families. Companies which had saved so much by effectively placing their employees at considerable risk need qualified California mesothelioma lawyers to stand up to them in order to provide financial relief from the devastation caused by asbestos. Mesothelioma lawsuits are unfortunately the only available method of holding companies responsible for their asbestos negligence. A valid mesothelioma lawsuit will not only assists the victim in covering his astronomical medical expenses, but they also help to create awareness and ethical actions by other companies faced with choices during construction. California mesothelioma lawyers who have excelled in the representation of Mesothelioma victims have surpassed most attorneys in providing aggressive care and representation for their clients. Mesothelioma has become such a glaring example of lack of company concern for their valuable employees. Big companies are required to examine their practices and their human obligation because of Mesothelioma lawsuits and the vast expense of Mesothelioma settlements. Most of the companies chose to provide less than adequate protection for their workers but chose to provide good fire protection for their buildings. They did not mind some of their workers falling ill of even dying as long as they were able to preserve their buildings. California workers have had enough of California bad business practice of placing production and performance over the health of their workers. The public needs to let these exploitative Carlifornia companies know that they would not allow them to exploit them any longer, they must challenge them in courts through the use of Mesothelioma lawsuits. Bello Kamorudeen.http://www.mesotheliomacorner.blogspot.com via Mesothelioma arena: Asbestos is a fibrous material which has been in use for a long time mainly for its fire resistant qualities. Asbestos is a preferred building material due to its fire resistant and heat resistant capability coupled with the fact that it is not expensive.Asbestos was very popular amongst California business owners in the early and mid 20′s and they used it in nearly every way they could. They tried to use asbestos to create safer, and cheaper buildings, but time has proven that these building are not any safer, nor are they more cheaper,as the high cost of treating the mesothelioma disease that they caused, they also lead to loss of lives.Asbestos was once used in everything from automotive parts, clothing, and blankets. It … For more info: Mesothelioma and Asbestos Mesothelioma arena Mesothelioma and Asbestos L’articolo Mesothelioma and Asbestos sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

New study finds spike in sugary drink consumption among California adolescents

New study finds spike in sugary drink consumption among California adolescents While consumption of soda and other sugary drinks among young children in California is starting to decline, a new study released shows an alarming 8 percent spike among adolescents, the biggest consumers of these beverages. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Oct. 18, 2013 — While consumption of soda and other sugary drinks among young children in California is starting to decline, a new study released today shows an alarming 8 percent spike among adolescents, the biggest consumers of these beverages.Based on interviews with more than 40,000 California households conducted by the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), the study, “Still Bubbling Over: California Adolescents Drinking More Soda and Other Sugar-Sweetened Beverages,” provides a comprehensive look at youth (2- to 17-year-olds) consumption of sugary drinks, charting consumption patterns from 2005-07 to 2011-12.The study, which also provides county-by-county youth consumption rates, was produced collaboratively by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the California Center for Public Health Advocacy.The most encouraging finding was the dramatic drop in the proportion of young children drinking sugary beverages daily over the seven-year period. Only 19 percent of 2- to 5-year-olds drink a sugary beverage daily, a 30 percent decline from the 2005-07 reporting period. Among 6- to 11-year-olds, 32 percent were daily consumers in 2011-12, representing a 26 percent drop since 2005-07.Of greatest concern, however, is the significant rise among the biggest consumers of sugary drinks — adolescents (12- to 17-year-olds). Today, a full 65 percent of California adolescents drink sugary beverages daily, an 8 percent climb since 2005-07. And while the study’s authors point out that roughly the same proportion of these youth are drinking soda, 23 percent more are consuming energy and sports drinks every day.”California has made real progress in reducing the consumption of sugary beverages among young children,” said Dr. Susan Babey, the report’s lead author. “But teens are in trouble. Soda or sports drinks should be an occasional treat, not a daily habit. If this trend isn’t reversed, there may be costly consequences for teens, their families and the health care system in the form of increased obesity and diabetes.”Although the study does not directly examine the causes for the sugary spike among teens, Dr. … For more info: New study finds spike in sugary drink consumption among California adolescents ScienceDaily: Living Well News New study finds spike in sugary drink consumption among California adolescents L’articolo New study finds spike in sugary drink consumption among California adolescents sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Vitamin D does not contribute to kidney stones

Vitamin D does not contribute to kidney stones Increased vitamin D levels may prevent a wide range of diseases, according to recent studies. However, some previous studies led to a concern that vitamin D supplementation could increase an individual’s risk of developing kidney stones. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Oct. 17, 2013 — Increased vitamin D levels may prevent a wide range of diseases, according to recent studies. However, some previous studies led to a concern that vitamin D supplementation could increase an individual’s risk of developing kidney stones.However, a study of 2,012 participants — published in the American Journal of Public Health -found no statistically relevant association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25 (OH)D) serum level in the range of 20 to 100 ng/mL and the incidence of kidney stones.This study — led by Cedric F. Garland, DrPH, adjunct professor in the Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine — used data from the nonprofit public health promotion organization GrassrootsHealth to follow more than 2,000 men and women of all ages for 19 months.Only 13 individuals self-reported a kidney stone diagnosis during the study.”Mounting evidence indicates that a Vitamin D serum level in the therapeutic range of 40 to 50 ng/mL is needed for substantial reduction in risk of many diseases, including breast and colorectal cancer,” said Garland, adding that this serum level is generally only achieved by taking vitamin supplements. “Our results may lessen concerns by individuals about taking vitamin D supplements, as no link was shown between such supplementation and an increased risk for kidney stones.”The study did show that older age, male gender and higher body mass index (BMI) were all risk factors for developing kidney stones. According to the researchers, individuals with high BMI need higher vitamin D intake than their leaner counterparts to achieve the same 25 (OH)D serum level. For more info: Vitamin D does not contribute to kidney stones ScienceDaily: Top Health News Vitamin D does not contribute to kidney stones L’articolo Vitamin D does not contribute to kidney stones sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Breakthrough Mesothelioma Case

Breakthrough Mesothelioma Case On February 13, 2012, the Italian court announced a verdict that may have an impact on people and families around the world who are dealing with mesothelioma. Billionaires Stephan Schidheiny and Jean-Louis de Cartier, key shareholders in the company Eternit, a producer of fiber-reinforced cement, were each sentenced to sixteen years in prison for the failure to comply with safety regulations in their factories’ uses of asbestos. This class action law suit is being touted as the most significant suit yet, because criminal charges were actually placed on the owners who benefited from the profits of the negligent factories. Invented in the late 19th century, fiber-reinforced cement products, generally containing a mixture of cement and asbestos, has been favored in construction for it’s relatively light weight along with its resistance to fire and water. Production of this material has reduced significantly since the public has been aware of the risks of exposure to friable asbestos. Prosecutors in the Eternit case claimed that at least 1,800 people died as a result of asbestos-related diseases in the town of Casale Monferrato, where the largest of the company’s factories was located. According to some reports, the company conducted its asbestos disposal in the open, releasing clouds of friable asbestos into the air to settle and collect on the town’s streets. They also gave left-over asbestos to families to use at home. When evidence of the dangers of asbestos began to surface, the company apparently concealed it and continued harmful practices, intending to protect the company profits. In addition to facing criminal charges, Schidheiny and de Cartier were ordered to pay €95 million (about $126 million US dollars) to families of the victims, as well as large sums to other entities and organizations, including trade unions and the town of Casale. This is a clear victory for asbestos awareness groups and advocates of mesothelioma victim’s rights. One of the biggest challenges facing groups dedicated to raising awareness about the dangers of asbestos is the inconsistency among trading nations in their asbestos laws and regulations. Many workers rights groups, environmental advocates, and asbestos awareness groups are hoping this case will have positive global impact on this issue. via Mesothelioma Blog: On February 13, 2012, the Italian court announced a verdict that may have an impact on people and families around the world who are dealing with mesothelioma. Billionaires Stephan Schidheiny and Jean-Louis de Cartier, key shareholders in the company Eternit, a producer of fiber-reinforced cement, were each sentenced to sixteen years in prison for the failure to comply with safety regulations in their factories’ uses of asbestos. This class action law suit is being touted as the most significant suit yet, because criminal charges were actually placed on the owners who benefited from the profits of the negligent factories.Invented in the late 19th century, fiber-reinforced cement products, generally containing a mixture of cement and asbestos, has been favored in construction for it’s relatively light weight … For more info: Breakthrough Mesothelioma Case Mesothelioma Blog Breakthrough Mesothelioma Case L’articolo Breakthrough Mesothelioma Case sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Organ donor promotion brings increase in registrations

Organ donor promotion brings increase in registrations More than 90 percent of the public supports organ donation, yet less than half the population registers as donors, surveys show. What if registration was better promoted to those who had previously turned it down? via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Oct. 9, 2013 — More than 90 percent of the public supports organ donation, yet less than half the population registers as donors, surveys show.What if registration was better promoted to those who had previously turned it down? And at the place almost everyone makes that decision, the DMV?Research at 40 Department of Motor Vehicles facilities in Illinois shows such efforts can make a difference. An article about the work was published in the September/October issue of the journal Clinical Transplantation.University of Illinois professor Brian Quick and his research colleagues implemented a phased multiple-message campaign that placed printed materials – in the form of brochures, counter mats and posters – in 20 of those 40 facilities during four months in 2011. They also trained volunteers to hand out materials and provide information to visitors, and then scheduled those volunteers in the facilities during the middle two of those four months.They also conducted a media campaign with radio and billboard ads (roadside and bus) during the first two months of the campaign, in the areas those 20 facilities served.Half of the 20 had historically had a high rate of donor registration, and half low. The other 20 facilities in the study served as a control group, also split between historically high- and low-registration facilities.The result for the 20 sites that got the campaign was a “statistically significant” reduction in the downward trend for registration at driver facilities, when compared to those in the control group, according to Quick, whose research focuses on health communication. He is a professor in the department of communication and in the College of Medicine at Illinois.The improvement was not dramatic, but Quick said the findings were meaningful because most of those who registered this time had likely been asked before and declined, as part of their previous license renewal. The question has been part of the license renewal process since Illinois created its first-person, legally binding consent registry for organ donation in 2006.”We were not going after the lowest-hanging fruit” in the campaign, Quick said. “We were seeking people who were resistant to registering as organ donors.”When media, materials and volunteers were all in place, in the second month of the study, the historically low-registration facilities that got the campaign showed a registration rate of 17.75 percent, compared to 15.22 percent for those in the control group. Among the historically high-registration facilities, the rates were 23.83 percent vs. … For more info: Organ donor promotion brings increase in registrations ScienceDaily: Living Well News Organ donor promotion brings increase in registrations L’articolo Organ donor promotion brings increase in registrations sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Genetically modified tobacco plants are viable for producing biofuels

Genetically modified tobacco plants are viable for producing biofuels An agricultural engineer has demonstrated, for the first time, the viability of using specific tobacco proteins (known as thioredoxins) as biotechnological tools in plants. Specifically, she has managed to increase the amount of starch produced in the tobacco leaves by 700% and fermentable sugars by 500%. via ScienceDaily: Agriculture and Food News: Oct. 14, 2013 — In her PhD thesis Ruth Sanz-Barrio, an agricultural engineer of the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre and researcher at the Institute of Biotechnology (mixed centre of the CSIC-Spanish National Research Council, Public University of Navarre and the Government of Navarre), has demonstrated, for the first time, the viability of using specific tobacco proteins (known as thioredoxins) as biotechnological tools in plants. Specifically, she has managed to increase the amount of starch produced in the tobacco leaves by 700% and fermentable sugars by 500%. “We believe that these genetically modified plants,” she explained, “could be a good alternative to food crops for producing biofuels, and could provide an outlet for the tobacco-producing areas in our country that see their future in jeopardy owing to the discontinuing of European grants for this crop.”Thioredoxins (Trxs) are small proteins present in most living organisms. In the course of her research Ruth Sanz demonstrated the capacity of the thioredoxins f and m in tobacco as biotechnological tools not only to increase the starch content in the plant but also to increase the production of proteins like human albumin. “For some time Trxs have been known to have a regulating function in living organisms, but in the thesis we have shown that they can also act by helping other proteins to fold and structure themselves so that they become functional.”Human albumin is the most widely used intravenous protein in the world for therapeutic purposes. It is used to stabilize blood volume and prevent the risk of infarction, and its application in operating theatres is almost a daily occurrence. It is also used in burns, surgical operations, haemorrhages, or when the patient is undernourished or dehydrated, and in the case of chronic infections and renal or hepatic diseases.Although commercial albumin is extracted from blood, the lack of a sufficient volume in reserve has prompted many researchers to seek new formulas for obtaining this protein on a large scale economically and safely. “We have come up with an easier, cheaper procedure for producing it in the tobacco plant and extracting it. By fusing the genes encoding the Trxs f or m, we increased the amount of recombinant protein (the albumin, in this case). … For more info: Genetically modified tobacco plants are viable for producing biofuels ScienceDaily: Agriculture and Food News Genetically modified tobacco plants are viable for producing biofuels L’articolo Genetically modified tobacco plants are viable for producing biofuels sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Healthier Diets Possible in Low-Income, Rural Communities

Healthier Diets Possible in Low-Income, Rural Communities In the United States, children don’t eat enough fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Instead, their diets typically include excessive amounts of sugars and solid fats, counter to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommendations, increasing the risk of obesity and diabetes. A team of investigators implemented a two-year intervention study in low-income, rural areas where a disproportionately higher risk of overweight and obesity habits among children persists. The children enrolled in the study consumed significantly more fruits and vegetables. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Oct. 11, 2013 — In the United States, children don’t eat enough fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Instead, their diets typically include excessive amounts of sugars and solid fats, counter to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommendations, increasing the risk of obesity and diabetes. A team of investigators implemented a two-year intervention study in low-income, rural areas where a disproportionately higher risk of overweight and obesity habits among children persists, leading to increased risk of diabetes and heart disease in adulthood. The children enrolled in the study consumed significantly more fruits and vegetables. The results are published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.To evaluate students’ diet quality at the beginning and after the study, researchers designed the CHANGE (Creating Healthy, Active and Nurturing Growing-up Environments) study, a two-year randomized, controlled, community- and school-based intervention to prevent unhealthy weight gain among rural school-aged children.”Our primary objectives were to improve the diets, physical activity levels, and weight status of rural children based on the successful model developed by Tufts University researchers for the Shape Up Somerville study,” says lead investigator Christina Economos, PhD, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston . “The objective of our analysis was to examine changes in fruit, vegetable, legume, whole-grain and low-fat dairy consumption among rural elementary students who were exposed to the CHANGE study intervention compared with students in control schools,” says lead author Juliana F. W. Cohen, ScM, ScD, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. The team wanted to test its hypothesis that students exposed to the study would improve their diet quality due to healthier food environments.Eight communities in rural California, Kentucky, Mississippi, and South Carolina participated in the study between 2007 and 2009. … For more info: Healthier Diets Possible in Low-Income, Rural Communities ScienceDaily: Living Well News Healthier Diets Possible in Low-Income, Rural Communities L’articolo Healthier Diets Possible in Low-Income, Rural Communities sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Historic trends predict future global reforestation unlikely

Historic trends predict future global reforestation unlikely Feeding a growing global population while also slowing or reversing global deforestation may only be possible if agricultural yields rise and/or per capita food consumption declines over the next century, via ScienceDaily: Agriculture and Food News: Oct. 9, 2013 — Feeding a growing global population while also slowing or reversing global deforestation may only be possible if agricultural yields rise and/or per capita food consumption declines over the next century, according to historic global food consumption and land use trends. Published October 9, 2013, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Chris Pagnutti, Chris Bauch, and Madhur Anand from the University of Guelph, this research underscores the long-term challenge of feeding everyone while still conserving natural habitat.Share This:To predict future global forest trends, the scientists used several centuries of global land use data from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and other sources. They incorporated this data into their mathematical model designed to capture how land use transitions, including deforestation and reforestation, are driven by three key factors: agricultural yield, per capita food consumption, and world population change over time.Based on historic trends that show growing food consumption outpacing rising agricultural yields, global forest cover is predicted to decline about 10% further, stabilizing at roughly 22% forest cover over the next century. Unless new technological advances increase yields, or strategies to decrease food consumption are introduced, a switch to global reforestation remains unlikely. Under an alternative scenario where food production and consumption stabilize, reforestation could increase global forest cover to about 35% if it occurs within the next 70 years. Additionally, researchers found that short-term trends in reforestation, deforestation, and abandoned agricultural land may play a role in understanding long-term forest trends.The results suggest that equal effort should be directed toward finding ways to boost agricultural yield, disseminate those technologies to developing countries, and decrease per capita consumption, thus reducing land use pressures. Anand elaborates, “What is new here is the provision of a set of quantitative guidelines (the mathematical model outputs) that demonstrate exactly how much improvements to agricultural yield or decreases in consumption will affect forest cover dynamics in time. Not every outcome was predictable to us before we had this model, especially the case of the ‘false forest transition’.”Share this story on Facebook, Twitter, and Google:Other social bookmarking and sharing tools:|Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. … For more info: Historic trends predict future global reforestation unlikely ScienceDaily: Agriculture and Food News Historic trends predict future global reforestation unlikely L’articolo Historic trends predict future global reforestation unlikely sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

PHP/Ajax/jQuery file manager/uploader by hybride

1. I need a file manager + multi-file uploader built in PHP with ajax/jquery capabilities. 2. User has to have ability to upload to own folder 3. Ability to delete/rename/move files 4. Ability to delete/rename/move/create folders… (Budget: $30-$250 USD, Jobs: AJAX, jQuery / Prototype, MySQL, PHP, Software Architecture) via Freelancer.com – New Projects filtered by Keyword: PHP/Ajax/jQuery file manager/uploader by hybride 1. I need a file manager + multi-file uploader built in PHP with ajax/jquery capabilities. 2. User has to have ability to upload to own folder 3. Ability to delete/rename/move files 4. Ability to delete/rename/move/create folders… (Budget: $30-$250 USD, Jobs: AJAX, jQuery / Prototype, MySQL, PHP, Software Architecture) For more info: PHP/Ajax/jQuery file manager/uploader by hybride Freelancer.com – New Projects filtered by Keyword PHP/Ajax/jQuery file manager/uploader by hybride L’articolo PHP/Ajax/jQuery file manager/uploader by hybride sembra essere il primo su Ajax Time.

The art of Peter La

The art of Peter La The art of Peter La via design42day » Search Results » digital+art: | Digital artist, Peter La, is the creator of some of the most fascinating illustrations we’ve seen recently. The artist, a well-rounded individual with an astonishing set of skills extending far beyond those of drawing and graphic design, is a former user interface specialist for games. Recently, he decided to shift away from the world of gaming, to that of ethereal concept art and he’s doing a kick-ass job. With an insane talent, and an outstanding personal aesthetic, he is bound to go places. His pieces reminisce of obscure games, chimerical characters, apocalyptic scenarios and fantastic transformers. The magnetism of his design is to be found in the perfect color mixes and smooth transitions, the carefully balanced intertwining of blurred, fuzzy contours with harsh brush strokes, and the vivid atmosphere depicted. Regardless of the theme of his images, the characters appear almost alive, taking the viewer into a world of fantasy, unlocking the darkest corners of his imagination. Peter La’s heroes draw almost titanic dimensions, emerging as wondrous Gods, imposing, startling; all pieces evoke a certain anxiety and fear, inducing a rather haunting feeling on the viewer. Looking through his portfolio, you feel as if you are witness to an extraordinary invasion of all-mighty alien gods, with unbounded powers and unheard of qualities, about to have a mythical, surreal sky battle. Fond of conceptual art, bizarre robotic constructions, and hazy, unearthly vectors, Peter set himself apart from the crowd. His thriving imagination, along with his superior brushing and blending skills, has aided him in constructing a fabulous realm and a set of unforgettable characters. Just as elusive and mysterious as his titans, Peter La keeps a well-guarded distance from the public eye. He prefers making an impact and telling a story through his work, rather than words. The little information known about him is that he is based in Toronto, Canada, and that he used to work in designing games’ interfaces. The rest, who knows? This makes it all much more exciting and intriguing. Peter La, you’re doing it right! For more info: The art of Peter La design42day » Search Results » digital+art The art of Peter La Originally posted 2013-06-07 02:34:38. Republished by Blog Post PromoterWeb Net 3.0 The art of Peter La Italian Design Italian Design – made in italy design furniture

Ancient Steps – Amazing Pictures

Evidenziamo questa notizia da: lighting in italy – Google Blog Search: Ancient Steps – Amazing Pictures Blue Grotto, Capri, Italy. The Blue Grotto is one of several sea caves, worldwide, that is flooded with a brilliant blue or emerald light. The quality and nature of the color in each cave is determined by the unique lighting … Per questa news ringraziamo: lighting in italy – Google Blog Search e vi invitiamo a continuare la lettura su: Ancient Steps – Amazing Pictures Ancient Steps – Amazing Pictures Originally posted 2013-05-27 03:41:01. Republished by Blog Post PromoterWeb Net 3.0 Ancient Steps – Amazing Pictures Italian Design Italian Design – made in italy design furniture

Colonoscopy screening every ten years could prevent 40% of colorectal cancers

Colonoscopy screening every ten years could prevent 40% of colorectal cancers According to a large, long-term study, 40% of all colorectal cancers might be prevented if people underwent regular colonoscopy screening. The new research also supports existing guidelines that recommend that people with an average risk of colorectal cancer should have a colonoscopy every 10 years. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Sep. 18, 2013 — According to a large, long-term study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), 40% of all colorectal cancers might be prevented if people underwent regular colonoscopy screening. The new research also supports existing guidelines that recommend that people with an average risk of colorectal cancer should have a colonoscopy every 10 years.The new study helps address previous uncertainty about the effectiveness of colonoscopy in reducing colorectal cancer incidence and mortality — particularly among people with cancer that originates in the proximal, or upper part of the colon.The study appears in the September 19, 2013 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.”Colonoscopy is the most commonly used screening test in the U.S. but there was insufficient evidence on how much it reduces the risk of proximal colon cancer and how often people should undergo the procedure,” said Shuji Ogino, co-senior author and associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology at HSPH. “Our study provides strong evidence that colonoscopy is an effective technique for preventing cancers of both distal and proximal regions of the colorectum, while sigmoidoscopy alone is insufficient for preventing proximal cancer.”According to the most recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 137,000 people in the U.S. were diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2009, and nearly 52,000 died that year from the disease. Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related death in the nation.The researchers analyzed data from 88,902 participants in two long-term studies: the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Based on data from questionnaires that participants filled out every two years between 1988 and 2008, the researchers obtained information on colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy procedures. They documented 1,815 cases of colorectal cancer and 474 deaths from the disease.They found that both colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy — which screens for tumors in the distal, or lower part of the colorectum — were associated with decreased risk of either getting colorectal cancer or dying from it. Only colonoscopy decreased the risk for cancers originating in the proximal colon, but not to the degree of its protective effect against distal colorectal cancers. … For more info: Colonoscopy screening every ten years could prevent 40% of colorectal cancers ScienceDaily: Top Health News Colonoscopy screening every ten years could prevent 40% of colorectal cancers L’articolo Colonoscopy screening every ten years could prevent 40% of colorectal cancers sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Rare gene variant linked to macular degeneration

Rare gene variant linked to macular degeneration An international team of researchers has identified a gene mutation linked to age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in Americans over age 50. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Sep. 16, 2013 — An international team of researchers, led by scientists at The Genome Institute at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Michigan School of Public Health in Ann Arbor, has identified a gene mutation linked to age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in Americans over age 50.It’s not the first gene variation linked to AMD, but it is the first to suggest a mechanism where the variant may contribute to the disease. The researchers report that a change in the C3 gene, which plays a role in inflammation and in the body’s immune response, also contributes to macular degeneration.The study was published online Sept. 15 in the journal Nature Genetics.”In past studies of AMD, there is a clear relationship between the complement pathway and the onset of this disease,” said co-senior investigator Elaine R. Mardis, PhD. “The complement system is part of the immune system that helps amplify or ‘complement’ the efforts of immune cells to fight infections. So the idea is that the gene variant interferes with the complement pathway’s normal function throughout life, and that can damage the retina over time, which ultimately leads to AMD’s emergence.”The researchers sequenced DNA from 10 regions of the genome that had been linked to AMD in previous genetic studies. They analyzed a total of 57 genes in 2,335 patients with macular degeneration. Then the researchers sequenced the same genes in 789 people of the same age who did not have AMD.The search turned up two gene variants: one in the C3 complement gene, and an alteration that had been identified in previous studies of macular degeneration.”Finding the variant that had been identified previously helped confirm that we were on the right track,” explained Mardis, a professor of genetics and co-director of the Genome Institute. … For more info: Rare gene variant linked to macular degeneration ScienceDaily: Top Health News Rare gene variant linked to macular degeneration L’articolo Rare gene variant linked to macular degeneration sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

IAS General Studies Biology Online Coaching with inbuild revision

Portiamo in evidenza questo articolo da: Videos matching: biology online: IAS General Studies Biology Online Coaching with inbuild revision http://www.youtube.com/v/iLY01e_6E1Y?version=3&f=videos&app=youtube_gdata Human Body Organ System – Biology class.www.iasgeneralstudies.comLearn the concepts in simpler and easier way.Clear understanding is possible.Completely exam oriented teaching.Class will useful for IAS prelimns, various state public service group 1, group 2 preliminary exams.Learn then and there with inbuilt revision.Our Per questa notizia si ringrazia: Videos matching: biology online e vi invitiamo a continuare la lettura su: IAS General Studies Biology Online Coaching with inbuild revision IAS General Studies Biology Online Coaching with inbuild revision Originally posted 2013-04-27 22:38:05. Republished by Blog Post PromoterL’articolo IAS General Studies Biology Online Coaching with inbuild revision sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Medicaid pays for nearly half of all births in the United States

Medicaid pays for nearly half of all births in the United States Medicaid paid for nearly half of the 3.8 million births in the United States in 2010 — an amount that has been rising over time. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Sep. 3, 2013 — Medicaid paid for nearly half of the 3.8 million births in the United States in 2010—an amount that has been rising over time, according to a report out today. The study, published in the September 2013 issue of the peer-reviewed journal Women’s Health Issues, offers the most comprehensive information to date on Medicaid financing of births in each of the 50 states and nationally.The new data will help researchers gauge the impact of health reform on maternal and child health, the authors say. Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), some states are expanding Medicaid and the expansion may lead to improved coverage of well-woman and maternity care—and perhaps result in better health outcomes, said lead author of the study Anne Markus, JD, PhD, MHS, an associate professor of health policy at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS).“As states expand coverage, low-income women of childbearing age will be able to obtain more continuous coverage before and between pregnancies,” said Markus. “Now, for the first time, researchers will have a comprehensive baseline that will help them determine how increased access to services might change pregnancies and ultimately birth outcomes.”Previously, data on Medicaid funding of births either did not exist in a comprehensive form or were not reliable. Markus and a team that included researchers from the March of Dimes set out to change that by collecting all such data on Medicaid births from individual states from 2008 to 2010.They discovered that in 2010 Medicaid paid for 48 percent of all births in the United States, up from 40 percent of Medicaid covered births in 2008. That represents a 19 percent increase in the proportion of all births financed by Medicaid and a 5 percent increase in the total number of Medicaid-financed births in just two years. The authors found that the number of Medicaid-financed births increased by 90,000 over the course of the study.The hope is that researchers will be able to use such data to determine whether rates of Medicaid financing of births change in the coming years and whether there is a connection between Medicaid coverage and health outcomes. For example, future studies would be able to examine whether expanding Medicaid coverage before and between pregnancies leads to fewer complicated pregnancies and more healthy, full-term babies.“About half a million babies are born prematurely in the United States every year,” said March of Dimes President Dr. Jennifer L. … For more info: Medicaid pays for nearly half of all births in the United States ScienceDaily: Top Health News Medicaid pays for nearly half of all births in the United States L’articolo Medicaid pays for nearly half of all births in the United States sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Sports addictions can ruin relationships

Sports addictions can ruin relationships Sports are an enjoyable past-time, but they should be just that. Youth sports and marriages can be ruined by an adult’s addiction to the game. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Sep. 3, 2013 — As players take the field for fall sports like football, experts at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) remind adults that an obsessive focus on any sport can deter kids from playing and damage relationships.Sandra Sims, Ph.D., associate professor of human studies in the UAB School of Education, said while parents do not purposefully take the joy out of their children’s games, being overzealous about their abilities, effort or participation can do just that.“Young athletes have two needs that should be fulfilled, and those are to feel worthy and have fun,” explained Sims, who was a middle- and high-school teacher and coach for 20 years.“When a sport is no longer fun – if the child feels the sport is more like a job – they will quit,” she said. “It’s sad to see them walk away.”Josh Klapow, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Public Health, added that parents’ good intentions can get in the way of kids’ sports.“Conflict arises when we are unable to distinguish between what we want for our children and what we wanted for ourselves in the past,” Klapow said. “When the lines get blurred, that is where problems start.”Klapow noted that sports can start problems in an adult’s life, kids or no kids, and said red flags include if sports cause them to miss important family gatherings or become violent.“Listen to those around you,” he advised. “If family and friends say you are taking it too far, be brave enough to back off a bit.”Klapow offered the following tips to manage a sports addiction:• Set limits, such as one sporting event per week.• Substitute new behaviors for sports viewing, such as exercise or spending time with family or friends.• Seek help from a mental-health professional to help address concerns regarding your habit. For more info: Sports addictions can ruin relationships ScienceDaily: Living Well News Sports addictions can ruin relationships L’articolo Sports addictions can ruin relationships sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.