Video game play may provide learning, health, social benefits

Video game play may provide learning, health, social benefits Playing video games, including violent shooter games, may boost children’s learning, health and social skills, according to a review of research on the positive effects of video game play. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Nov. 25, 2013 — Playing video games, including violent shooter games, may boost children’s learning, health and social skills, according to a review of research on the positive effects of video game play to be published by the American Psychological Association.The study comes out as debate continues among psychologists and other health professionals regarding the effects of violent media on youth. An APA task force is conducting a comprehensive review of research on violence in video games and interactive media and will release its findings in 2014.”Important research has already been conducted for decades on the negative effects of gaming, including addiction, depression and aggression, and we are certainly not suggesting that this should be ignored,” said lead author Isabela Granic, PhD, of Radboud University Nijmegen in The Netherlands. “However, to understand the impact of video games on children’s and adolescents’ development, a more balanced perspective is needed.”The article will be published in APA’s flagship journal, American Psychologist.While one widely held view maintains playing video games is intellectually lazy, such play actually may strengthen a range of cognitive skills such as spatial navigation, reasoning, memory and perception, according to several studies reviewed in the article. This is particularly true for shooter video games that are often violent, the authors said. A 2013 meta-analysis found that playing shooter video games improved a player’s capacity to think about objects in three dimensions, just as well as academic courses to enhance these same skills, according to the study. “This has critical implications for education and career development, as previous research has established the power of spatial skills for achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics,” Granic said. This enhanced thinking was not found with playing other types of video games, such as puzzles or role-playing games.Playing video games may also help children develop problem-solving skills, the authors said. The more adolescents reported playing strategic video games, such as role-playing games, the more they improved in problem solving and school grades the following year, according to a long-term study published in 2013. Children’s creativity was also enhanced by playing any kind of video game, including violent games, but not when the children used other forms of technology, such as a computer or cell phone, other research revealed.Simple games that are easy to access and can be played quickly, such as “Angry Birds,” can improve players’ moods, promote relaxation and ward off anxiety, the study said. … For more info: Video game play may provide learning, health, social benefits ScienceDaily: Living Well News Video game play may provide learning, health, social benefits L’articolo Video game play may provide learning, health, social benefits sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Gene found responsible for susceptibility to panic disorder

Gene found responsible for susceptibility to panic disorder A study published points, for the first time, to the gene trkC as a factor in susceptibility to a panic disorder. The researchers define the specific mechanism for the formation of fear memories which will help in the development of new pharmacological and cognitive treatments. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Nov. 28, 2013 — A study published recently in the Journal of Neuroscience points, for the first time, to the gene trkC as a factor in susceptibility to the disease. The researchers define the specific mechanism for the formation of fear memories which will help in the development of new pharmacological and cognitive treatments.Five out of every 100 people in Spain suffer from panic disorder, one of the diseases included within the anxiety disorders, and they experience frequent and sudden attacks of fear that may influence their everyday lives, sometimes even rendering them incapable of things like going to the shops, driving the car or holding down a job.It was known that this disease had a neurobiological and genetic basis and for some time the search had been on to discover which genes were involved in its development, with certain genes being implicated without their physiopathological contribution being understood. Now, for the first time, researchers from the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) have revealed that the gene NTRK3, responsible for encoding a protein essential for the formation of the brain, the survival of neurons and establishing connections between them, is a factor in genetic susceptibility to panic disorder.”We have observed that deregulation of NTRK3 produces changes in brain development that lead to malfunctions in the fear-related memory system,” explains Mara Dierssen, head of the Cellular and Systems Neurobiology group at the CRG. “In particular, this system is more efficient at processessing information to do with fear, the thing that makes a person overestimate the risk in a situation and therefore feel more frightened and, also, that stores that information in a more lasting and consistent manner.”Different regions of the human brain are responsible for processing this feeling, although the hippocampus and amygdala play crucial roles. On the one hand, the hippocampus is responsible for forming memories and processing contextual information, which means that the person may be afraid of being in places where they could suffer a panic attack; and on the other, the amygdala is crucial in converting this information into a physiological fear response.Although these circuits are activated in everyone in warning situations, what the CRG researchers have discovered is that “in those people who suffer from panic disorder there is overactivation of the hippocampus and altered activation in the amygdala circuitry, resulting in exaggerated formation of fear memories,” explains Davide D’Amico, a PhD student at the CRG, co-author of the work and the article published in the Journal of Neuosciences, together with Dierssen and the researcher Mónica Santos.They have also found that Tiagabine, a drug that modulates the brain’s fear inhibition system, is able to reverse the formation of panic memories. Although it had already been observed to alleviate certain symptoms in some patients, “we have discovered that it specifically helps restore the fear memory system,” points out Dierssen.Panic disorderPanic attacks are a key symptom of panic disorder. They can last several minutes, be sudden and repeated, and the sufferer has a physical reaction similar to the alarm response to real danger, involving palpitations, cold sweats, dizziness, shortness of breath, tingling in the body, nausea and stomach pain. On top of this, they feel continuously anxious when faced with the prospect of suffering another attack.This study by the CRG researchers reveals that the way in which the memories resulting from a panic attack are stored is what ultimately ends up producing the disorder, which usually appears between 20 and 30 years of age. Although it has a genetic basis, it is also influenced by other environmental factors, such as accumulated stress. … For more info: Gene found responsible for susceptibility to panic disorder ScienceDaily: Top Health News Gene found responsible for susceptibility to panic disorder L’articolo Gene found responsible for susceptibility to panic disorder sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Mental health conditions cause greater stigma in families than physical problems

Mental health conditions cause greater stigma in families than physical problems Mental and physical illnesses necessarily impact upon the lives of the relatives of those afflicted by them, all the more so in families where a member has a mental illness, because they suffer more discrimination. The results are based on a study carried out in 28 countries. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Nov. 27, 2013 — Mental and physical illnesses necessarily impact upon the lives of the relatives of those afflicted by them, all the more so in families where a member has a mental illness, because they suffer more discrimination. The results are based on a study carried out in 28 countries, and Spain is one of them.Spanish researchers took part in the analysis of the mental health surveys conducted by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 28 countries to discover how prevalent mental conditions are in the world and what impact they have.As Jordi Alonso from IMIM (the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), explains to SINC: “The study published on embarrassment or stigma is straightforward, but it does bring some new elements to the fore, as it analyses a sizeable population in terms of care and support for patients.”The article published in Psychological Medicine estimates the degree to which a family member might feel embarrassed when a close relative is suffering from an alcohol, drug or mental health condition versus a general medical health condition.The results show that both mental and physical conditions are an onus on family members. “However, what is most notable is that relatives of patients with mental health illnesses feel greater stigma than those with physical conditions,” Alonso adds.To date, most studies have considered embarrassment internalized by the afflicted individual and stigma in society, but have not assessed these feelings in family members in a large-scale study.Furthermore, the authors highlight that these conclusions — which take into account the context of the country — are set out as an international trend and that the stigma is “clearly” due to the family member suffering from a mental health condition.”Therefore, we suggest that anti-stigma campaigns also include relatives within their target audience,” Alonso continues.Rights of the mentally illAs the WHO asserts, the mentally ill are exposed to considerable violations of their human rights all over the world. According to the largest healthcare institution, this stigma jeopardizes their treatment and pushes them towards isolation.”The mentally ill are confronted with discrimination on a daily basis in education, employment and housing,” he adds. In some countries they are even abused in various ways and prevented from voting, getting married or having children.The WHO proposes several means of avoiding this discrimination: increasing awareness; improving human rights in mental healthcare services; empowering users of mental healthcare services and their families; replacing psychiatric institutions with community healthcare; increasing investment and adopting policies, laws and services that promote human rights. For more info: Mental health conditions cause greater stigma in families than physical problems ScienceDaily: Living Well News Mental health conditions cause greater stigma in families than physical problems L’articolo Mental health conditions cause greater stigma in families than physical problems sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

School climate key to preventing bullying

School climate key to preventing bullying To effectively prevent bullying, schools need to understand positive school climate, use reliable measures to evaluate school climate and use effective prevention and intervention programs to improve the climate, a recent paper explains. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Nov. 25, 2013 — To effectively prevent bullying schools need to understand positive school climate, use reliable measures to evaluate school climate and use effective prevention and intervention programs to improve the climate, a recent paper co-authored by a University of California, Riverside assistant professor found.Cixin Wang, an assistant professor in the Graduate School of Education, co-authored the article, “The Critical Role of School Climate in Effective Bullying Prevention,” with Brandi Berry and Susan M. Swearer, both of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. It was published in the journal Theory Into Practice.”Bullying is a very complex problem,” Wang said. “With this research, we’re really trying to provide school personnel with some proven steps to address the problem.”In recent years, there has been an increased interest in reducing bullying behavior by school personnel, parents and students. However, educators have remained challenged about how to assess the factors that cause bullying and select evidence-based prevention and intervention programs.Wang and her colleagues sought to address these issues by highlighting the importance of school climate in bullying prevention and reviewing school climate evaluations and intervention programs.They found that positive relationships among students and teachers, and negative attitudes toward inappropriate behavior such as bullying are key elements of a positive school climate.To create a positive school climate, school personnel need to promote and model appropriate attitudes and behaviors, such as caring, empathy, and appropriate interactions among and between teachers and students.To foster attitudes against bullying, in addition to promoting knowledge and awareness of bullying, teachers need to take reports of any bullying incident seriously and intervene consistently according to school rules instead of ignoring or minimizing bullying behavior.Adult behavior is also critical foundation for a healthy school climate. Adults should refrain from bullying students and other adults at school. In addition, teachers need to incorporate school climate interventions into the curriculum and use teachable moments to openly discuss topics related to bullying, such as popularity, power and social ostracism.Finally, bullying is not only a behavior problem, but also a mental health problem. Research has shown that students involved in bullying experience more mental health difficulties and display higher levels of cognitive distortions. Thus, educators need to seek professional help from mental health practitioners for students involved in bullying and experiencing mental health difficulties. For more info: School climate key to preventing bullying ScienceDaily: Living Well News School climate key to preventing bullying L’articolo School climate key to preventing bullying sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Insight on cell migration, movement of cancer cells

Insight on cell migration, movement of cancer cells The migration of groups of cells in order to form tissues is common during the development of an organism. Discovering how these multiple movements are achieved is not only crucial to understand the basic principles of development, but provides new information and insights for further research into processes associated with the spread of cancer. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Nov. 21, 2013 — The migration of groups of cells in order to form tissues is common during the development of an organism. Discovering how these multiple movements are achieved is not only crucial to understand the basic principles of development but provides new information and insights for further research into processes associated with the spread of cancer.Jordi Casanova, head of the “Morphogenesis in Drosophila” lab at IRB Barcelona and CSIC research professor, and Gaëlle Lebreton, postdoctoral fellow in the same group, have published a study performed using Drosophila melanogaster in the Journal of Cell Science. This work reveals that in a multiple movement, a single cell can act as the leader and can drag the rest with it. The scientists have studied the tracheal development of Drosophila in vivo and describe the morphological characteristics of the leading cell and provide molecular details about how it drives the movement.”Cancer researchers are keen to know how cells are organized to achieve migration and to form new capillaries to feed an expanding cancerous tumor,” explains Gaëlle Lebreton, first author of the article. “Our study gives new data about how angiogenesis might arise,” comments the French scientist at IRB Barcelona. Angiogenesis or the formation of new blood vessels is a critical process in the context of cancer because it is one of the steps that mark the transformation of a benign tumour into a malignant one. The formation of new blood vessels involves the synchronized movements of groups of cells. In this regard, understanding how these groups work will open up new research lines on angiogenesis.Over seven hours, the scientists tracked a group of seven cells that form one of the tracheal branches of the fly Drosophila melanogaster in its first hours of development. The leading cell is the only one that has receptors for the growth factor FGF. … For more info: Insight on cell migration, movement of cancer cells ScienceDaily: Top Health News Insight on cell migration, movement of cancer cells L’articolo Insight on cell migration, movement of cancer cells sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

New light on dark energy, cosmic speed-up: Big Bang afterglow shows Earth has no special place in expanding universe

New light on dark energy, cosmic speed-up: Big Bang afterglow shows Earth has no special place in expanding universe Astronomers have ruled out a controversial theory that the accelerating expansion of the universe is an illusion. While the findings don’t explain the cosmic speed-up, they eliminate one provocative possibility that our planet, solar system and galaxy are at the center of the universe and that there is no dark energy. via ScienceDaily: Top Science News: Nov. 7, 2013 — In a new study, Dartmouth researchers rule out a controversial theory that the accelerating expansion of the universe is an illusion.While the findings don’t explain the cosmic speed-up, they eliminate one provocative possibility that our planet, solar system and galaxy are at the center of the universe and that there is no dark energy. The findings appear in the journal Physical Review D.The 2011 Nobel Prize was awarded for the discovery that the expansion of the universe is accelerating. One leading idea to explain the acceleration is a new, mysterious substance called dark energy, which is thought to make up nearly three-fourths of the energy of the universe. But another alternative is that Earth, our solar system and Milky Way galaxy are at the center of the universe. That theory violates the standard assumption that the universe has no center, but if true, then cosmic acceleration could be explained without dark energy or any new laws of physics.But Dartmouth researchers found that this model can’t hold up to other observational tests. The sky glows with light left over from the Big Bang, also known as the Cosmic Microwave Background, so they calculated how that glow would be affected. Their findings show that the model’s prediction is completely contrary to the glow that has been measured.”Essentially, we held a mirror up to the universe and asked if the reflection was special,” says Robert Caldwell, a professor of physics and astronomy who co-wrote the article with undergraduate physics major Nina Maksimova. “The reflection shows that we do not appear to live in a special location, and decisively excludes this explanation for the universe’s accelerating expansion. It would be a great relief to be able to understand a basic problem of cosmology within the known laws of physics, but our research is an important step in explaining the physics responsible for the cosmic acceleration.” For more info: New light on dark energy, cosmic speed-up: Big Bang afterglow shows Earth has no special place in expanding universe ScienceDaily: Top Science News New light on dark energy, cosmic speed-up: Big Bang afterglow shows Earth has no special place in expanding universe L’articolo New light on dark energy, cosmic speed-up: Big Bang afterglow shows Earth has no special place in expanding universe sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Aerobic exercise benefits memory in persons with MS

Aerobic exercise benefits memory in persons with MS A research study provides the first evidence for beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on brain and memory in individuals with multiple sclerosis. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Nov. 1, 2013 — A research study headed by Victoria Leavitt, Ph.D. and James Sumowski, Ph.D., of Kessler Foundation, provides the first evidence for beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on brain and memory in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). The article, “Aerobic exercise increases hippocampal volume and improves memory in multiple sclerosis: Preliminary findings,” was released as an epub ahead of print on October 4 by Neurocase: The Neural Basis of Cognition.Share This:Hippocampal atrophy seen in MS is linked to the memory deficits that affect approximately 50% of individuals with MS. Despite the prevalence of this disabling symptom, there are no effective pharmacological or behavioral treatments. “Aerobic exercise may be the first effective treatment for MS patients with memory problems,” noted Dr. Leavitt, research scientist in Neuropsychology & Neuroscience Research at Kessler Foundation. “Moreover, aerobic exercise has the advantages of being readily available, low cost, self-administered, and lacking in side effects.” No beneficial effects were seen with non-aerobic exercise. Dr. Leavitt noted that the positive effects of aerobic exercise were specific to memory; other cognitive functions such as executive functioning and processing speed were unaffected.The study’s participants were two MS patients with memory deficits who were randomized to non-aerobic (stretching) and aerobic (stationary cycling) conditions. … For more info: Aerobic exercise benefits memory in persons with MS ScienceDaily: Top Health News Aerobic exercise benefits memory in persons with MS L’articolo Aerobic exercise benefits memory in persons with MS sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

All girl getaways: The importance of female friendship throughout the life-cycle

All girl getaways: The importance of female friendship throughout the life-cycle A recent article, authors discuss the burgeoning trend of all-female holidays, the many different purposes and effects for those participating, and the relationship to the life-cycle of the women. The basis of the article was a study conducted by the authors featuring 79 women of different race, social class, nationality and marital and familial status. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: Oct. 24, 2013 — A recent article, published in Annals of Leisure Research, ‘Girlfriend getaways over the life course: change and continuity’ by Gibson, Berdychevsky and Bell discusses the burgeoning trend of all-female holidays, the many different purposes and effects for those participating and the relationship to the life-cycle of the women. The basis of the article was a study conducted by the authors featuring 79 women of different race, social class, nationality and marital and familial status. They were interviewed about their experiences of an all-female holiday and the information was categorised into themes such as bonding, escape, personal growth and adventure. For each person they fulfil a different role, depending on life stage. Their findings were divided into four life-stages: adolescence, early adulthood, middle adulthood and late adulthood.Share This:During adolescence, all girl holidays are a bond forming experience where participants get to discover the nitty-gritty of their friends’ personalities, form another dimension to their friendship and use their experiences to create unforgettable memories. They live out their desire for independence and express their rebellion and need to break away from family.At the early adult stage female getaways were found to represent adventure, experimentation, often post-graduation when life changing decisions are being made about their future. These getaways form a ‘rite of passage’ to the next life stage away from education towards career and family.Female breaks in middle adulthood enable women to feel young and free and have a break from family commitment. On the other hand they often facilitate less joyful transitions such as divorce or a traumatic life event like the death of a loved one. This life stage is when women have a drive to fulfil travel dreams whilst they are still able.During late adulthood, women see a female getaway as a statement of independence and confidence they may not have had in younger life, when they would not have travelled without a husband. … For more info: All girl getaways: The importance of female friendship throughout the life-cycle ScienceDaily: Living Well News All girl getaways: The importance of female friendship throughout the life-cycle L’articolo All girl getaways: The importance of female friendship throughout the life-cycle sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Lou Gehrig’s disease: From patient stem cells to potential treatment strategy

Lou Gehrig’s disease: From patient stem cells to potential treatment strategy A study is believed to be one of the first in which a specific form of Lou Gehrig’s disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, was replicated in a dish, analyzed and “treated,” suggesting a potential future therapy all in a single study. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Oct. 25, 2013 — Although the technology has existed for just a few years, scientists increasingly use “disease in a dish” models to study genetic, molecular and cellular defects. But a team of doctors and scientists led by researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute went further in a study of Lou Gehrig’s disease, a fatal disorder that attacks muscle-controlling nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.After using an innovative stem cell technique to create neurons in a lab dish from skin scrapings of patients who have the disorder, the researchers inserted molecules made of small stretches of genetic material, blocking the damaging effects of a defective gene and, in the process, providing “proof of concept” for a new therapeutic strategy — an important step in moving research findings into clinical trials.The study, published Oct. 23 in Science Translational Medicine, is believed to be one of the first in which a specific form of Lou Gehrig’s disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, was replicated in a dish, analyzed and “treated,” suggesting a potential future therapy all in a single study.”In a sense, this represents the full spectrum of what we are trying to accomplish with patient-based stem cell modeling. It gives researchers the opportunity to conduct extensive studies of a disease’s genetic and molecular makeup and develop potential treatments in the laboratory before translating them into patient trials,” said Robert H. Baloh, MD, PhD, director of Cedars-Sinai’s Neuromuscular Division in the Department of Neurology and director of the multidisciplinary ALS Program. He is the lead researcher and the article’s senior author.Laboratory models of diseases have been made possible by a recently invented process using induced pluripotent stem cells — cells derived from a patient’s own skin samples and “sent back in time” through genetic manipulation to an embryonic state. From there, they can be made into any cell of the human body.The cells used in the study were produced by the Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Core Facility of Cedars-Sinai’s Regenerative Medicine Institute. Dhruv Sareen, PhD, director of the iPSC facility and a faculty research scientist with the Department of Biomedical Sciences, is the article’s first author and one of several institute researchers who participated in the study.”In these studies, we turned skin cells of patients who have ALS into motor neurons that retained the genetic defects of the disease,” Baloh said. “We focused on a gene, C9ORF72, that two years ago was found to be the most common cause of familial ALS and frontotemporal lobar degeneration, and even causes some cases of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. … For more info: Lou Gehrig’s disease: From patient stem cells to potential treatment strategy ScienceDaily: Top Health News Lou Gehrig’s disease: From patient stem cells to potential treatment strategy L’articolo Lou Gehrig’s disease: From patient stem cells to potential treatment strategy sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Brief risk-reduction counseling at HIV testing does not result in reduction of STIs

Brief risk-reduction counseling at HIV testing does not result in reduction of STIs Brief risk-reduction counseling at the time of a rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test was not effective for reducing new sexually transmitted infections (STIs) during the subsequent 6 months among persons at risk for HIV, according to a study. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Oct. 22, 2013 — Brief risk-reduction counseling at the time of a rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test was not effective for reducing new sexually transmitted infections (STIs) during the subsequent 6 months among persons at risk for HIV, according to a study in the October 23/30 issue of JAMA.In the United States, approximately 1.1 million people are estimated to be living with HIV infection. The incidence of HIV infection is considered to have remained steady over the last decade, with about 50,000 new infections occurring annually. About l in 5 people living with HIV is thought to be undiagnosed. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended that all persons age 15 to 65 years be screened for HIV, according to background information in the article. A major issue regarding HIV testing of such a large population is the effectiveness of HIV risk-reduction counseling at the time of testing, because counseling involves considerable time, personnel, and financial costs.Lisa R. Metsch, Ph.D., of Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, New York, and colleagues conducted a trial to assess the effectiveness of counseling in reducing STI incidence among STI clinic patients. From April to December 2010, Project AWARE randomized 5,012 patients from 9 STI clinics in the United States to receive either brief patient-centered HIV risk-reduction counseling with a rapid HIV test or the rapid HIV test with information only. Participants were assessed for multiple STIs at both the beginning of the study and 6-month follow-up. … For more info: Brief risk-reduction counseling at HIV testing does not result in reduction of STIs ScienceDaily: Top Health News Brief risk-reduction counseling at HIV testing does not result in reduction of STIs L’articolo Brief risk-reduction counseling at HIV testing does not result in reduction of STIs sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog [Wikipedia Article]

The Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog is a bobtailed, medium sized breed of dog. The Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog was developed in Australia to herd cat…L’articolo Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog [Wikipedia Article] sembra essere il primo su BauBauNews.

Closing the gap: Digital Art and Millions. – The Fastlane Forum

Closing the gap: Digital Art and Millions. – The Fastlane Forum I've also found this relatively disheartening yet informative article in regards to why digital artists aren't becoming millionaires like programmers or web designers: [#DIGART] Why Your .JPEGs Aren't Making You A Millionaire … via web digital artist – Google Blog Search: For more info: Closing the gap: Digital Art and Millions. – The Fastlane Forum web digital artist – Google Blog Search Closing the gap: Digital Art and Millions. – The Fastlane Forum Originally posted 2013-08-23 14:50:28. Republished by Blog Post Promoterjkosgbqv Closing the gap: Digital Art and Millions. – The Fastlane Forum Italian Design Italian Design – made in italy design furniture

Article > CHMP stuns Pfizer with rejection of RA drug Xeljanz

Un post di particolare interesse dal: ra biologics – Google Blog Search: Article > CHMP stuns Pfizer with rejection of RA drug Xeljanz Many analysts believe it could be a game-changer given that biologics that have come on the market over the past ten years for RA – AbbVie's Humira (adalimumab), Amgen's Enbrel (etanercept) and Johnson & Johnson's … Per questo post si ringrazia: ra biologics – Google Blog Search e vi invitiamo a continuare la lettura su: Article > CHMP stuns Pfizer with rejection of RA drug Xeljanz Article > CHMP stuns Pfizer with rejection of RA drug Xeljanz Originally posted 2013-04-28 15:04:57. Republished by Blog Post PromoterL’articolo Article > CHMP stuns Pfizer with rejection of RA drug Xeljanz sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Proteins in histone group might influence cancer development, study shows

Proteins in histone group might influence cancer development, study shows Spool-like proteins called histones play a crucial role in packaging the nearly seven feet of DNA found in most human cells. It has been thought that a particular group of histone isoforms were functionally identical. This study shows that these isoforms can have distinct functions, and that they might play a role in cancer development. The results provide a new mechanism for the regulation of chromatin structure. via ScienceDaily: Top Health News: Sep. 3, 2013 — Spool-like proteins called histones play a crucial role in packaging the nearly seven feet of DNA found in most human cells. A new study shows that a group of histones that are thought to behave the same actually are functionally distinct proteins.The findings by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center — Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC — James) indicate that replication-dependent histone isoforms can have distinct cellular functions, and that changes in expression of the various isoforms might play a role in cancer development.The study is published in the journal Nucleic Acids Research as a Breakthrough Article, placing it among the top 2-3 percent of papers presented by the journal in terms of significance and excellence.”Replication-dependent histone isoforms have always been thought to be functionally identical, but we show that they have distinct functions, and that altering the levels of these isoforms can influence cell proliferation and tumor development,” says principal investigator Mark Parthun, PhD, professor of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry and a member of the OSUCCC — James Experimental Therapeutics Program.”These highly novel results provide a new mechanism for the regulation of chromatin structure, Parthun says.”Replication-dependent histones are highly expressed just before the onset of DNA replication during the cell cycle, and they are repressed when DNA replication is completed.The genes that encode these histones are located in large clusters that can contain dozens of histone genes. “This localization in gene clusters led to the belief that these histones are regulated as a group, and that the multiple genes encoding each histone are functionally equivalent,” Parthun says.However, the proteins encoded by replication-dependent histone genes are not identical. For example, 16 genes encode the replication-dependent histone called H2A. Strikingly, these genes encode 11 distinct protein variations.Parthun and his colleagues conducted the study using three bladder-cancer cell lines. Key findings include:The abundance of replication-dependent histone H2A isoforms showed dramatic differences in bladder cancer cells vs. normal bladder cells; Replication-dependent H2A isoforms were expressed at different levels in cancer cells; expression of one isoform was 10-fold higher than the others; Knocking down the messenger RNA of a specific replication-dependent H2A isoform increased cell proliferation and tumorigenicity. … For more info: Proteins in histone group might influence cancer development, study shows ScienceDaily: Top Health News Proteins in histone group might influence cancer development, study shows L’articolo Proteins in histone group might influence cancer development, study shows sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Average height of European males has grown by 11 centimeters in just over a century

Average height of European males has grown by 11 centimeters in just over a century The average height of European males increased by an unprecedented 11 centimeters between the mid-nineteenth century and 1980, according to a new article. Contrary to expectations, the study also reveals that average height actually accelerated in the period spanning the two World Wars and the Great Depression. via ScienceDaily: Top Science News: Sep. 2, 2013 — The average height of European males increased by an unprecedented 11 cm between the mid-nineteenth century and 1980, according to a new paper published online today in the journal Oxford Economic Papers. Contrary to expectations, the study also reveals that average height actually accelerated in the period spanning the two World Wars and the Great Depression.Timothy J. Hatton, Professor of Economics at the University of Essex and the Research School of Economics at Australian National University in Canberra, examined and analysed a new dataset for the average height (at the age of around 21) of adult male birth cohorts, from the 1870s to 1980, in fifteen European countries. The data were drawn from a variety of sources. For the most recent decades the data were mainly taken from height-by-age in cross sectional surveys. Meanwhile, observations for the earlier years were based on data for the heights of military conscripts and recruits. The data is for men only as the historical evidence for women’s heights is severely limited.Professor Hatton said, “Increases in human stature are a key indicator of improvements in the average health of populations. The evidence suggests that the improving disease environment, as reflected in the fall in infant mortality, is the single most important factor driving the increase in height. The link between infant mortality and height has already been demonstrated by a number of studies.” Infant mortality rates fell from an average of 178 per thousand in 1871-5 to 120 per thousand in 1911-15. … For more info: Average height of European males has grown by 11 centimeters in just over a century ScienceDaily: Top Science News Average height of European males has grown by 11 centimeters in just over a century L’articolo Average height of European males has grown by 11 centimeters in just over a century sembra essere il primo su My Biologica.

Best practice for constructing a jQuery mobile page by json

I am developing an android app using phonegap which call an api on page load getting a json object as a return parameter.now I have to construct the page using jQuery mobile by extracting values from the recieved object.So I am asking what will be the best practice for this which can reduce its loading time.Thanks for … via Android Application Development » Search Results » ajax: Best practice for constructing a jQuery mobile page by json I am developing an android app using phonegap which call an api on page load getting a json object as a return parameter.now I have to construct the page using jQuery mobile by extracting values from the recieved object.So I am asking what will be the best practice for this which can reduce its loading time.Thanks for helping.Presently what I am doing $(document).ready( function() $.ajax( url : “demourl.com”, type : “GET”, success : function(data) var obj = $.parseJSON(data); $(“#results”).html(obj.messagedetails[0].spamReason.userApprove);, fail : function() $(“#notification”).text(“Try again after some time.”); }); });Getting objects from this call and setting it in ……………………………………. There’s nothing you can do about $.ajax / $.getJSON loading time, it will depend on your internet connection. Never load data during the page transitions, do it ether before page change or after a page change. Best practice is to do it before page change (just show AJAX loader to indicate AJAX content is loading). When data is loaded use .append( and not .html( to append data. In case you are using each or for loop to add a dynamic content (laoded with an AJAX) UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES enhance page markup (apply jOuery Mobile style to new added content) during each loop, THIS IS A HUGE TIME SINK, do it only after all content has been added.You can find more about this in my ARTICLE, or find it HERE. Do not use document ready, it could trigger before page is loaded. Instead use correct page event. Find more about document ready vs page events in my other ARTICLE, here you will also find a way to benchmark jQuery Mobile and some statistic about how much time is needed for some jQM actions. For more info: Best practice for constructing a jQuery mobile page by json Android Application Development » Search Results » ajax Best practice for constructing a jQuery mobile page by json L’articolo Best practice for constructing a jQuery mobile page by json sembra essere il primo su Ajax Time.

More attractive real estate agents mean higher prices and profits

More attractive real estate agents mean higher prices and profits A recent study of physical attractiveness and how it impacts real estate brokers’ pay and productivity shows that the more attractive the real estate agent, the higher the listing price of the home for sale. via ScienceDaily: Living Well News: June 3, 2013 — At least for real estate agents, it turns out that beauty is indeed more than skin deep.A recent study of physical attractiveness and how it impacts real estate brokers’ pay and productivity shows that the more attractive the real estate agent, the higher the listing price of the home for sale.Those higher listings lead to higher sales prices, meaning that beauty enhances an agent’s wage, said the report by Frank Mixon, professor…

Cheating favors extinction, yeast study finds: Feedback between population and evolutionary dynamics

Cheating favors extinction, yeast study finds: Feedback between population and evolutionary dynamics Cooperative behavior is widely observed in nature, but there remains the possibility that ‘cheaters’ can exploit the system, with uncertain consequences for the social unit as a whole. A new study has found that a yeast colony dominated by non-producers (‘cheaters’) is more likely to face extinction than one consisting entirely of producers (‘co-operators’). The findings are the results of the first laboratory demonstration of a full evolutionary-ecological feedback loop in a social microbial population. via ScienceDaily: Ecology News: Apr. 30, 2013 — Cooperative behaviour is widely observed in nature, but there remains the possibility that so-called ‘cheaters’ can exploit the system, taking without giving, with uncertain…

How can I add a new Table with a Button click event MVC?

I have a table with text box asking for Name and Address for reference. If need be, I would like the user to have the ability to add more and not be restricted to just one. How would I add a new table to a form by clicking on my “getMore” button? Reference Name Address City State Zip Phone … via Asp.Net Developed Tutorials » Search Results » ajax: How can I add a new Table with a Button click event MVC? I have a table with text box asking for Name and Address for reference. If need be, I would like the user to have the ability to add more and not be restricted to just one. How would I add a new table…

carhop femininity: Frequently used biologic agents might cause …

Un interessante articolo by: biologic agents – Google Blog Search: carhop femininity: Frequently used biologic agents might cause … Apr. 29, 2013 ? A commonly used class of biologic response modifying drugs can cause acute liver injury with elevated liver enzymes, according to a new study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical … Per questo articolo si ringrazia: biologic agents – Google Blog Search e vi invitiamo a continuare la lettura su: carhop femininity: Frequently used biologic agents might cause … carhop femininity: Frequently used biologic agents might cause … L’articolo carhop femininity: Frequently used biologic agents might cause … sembra essere il primo su Biological News.

App.net Is an Open, User-Focused Social Network (We've Got Invites!)

App.net is a microblogging service where you own your data, can use whatever client you want, and can engage with a vibrant and smart community. App.net has been around for a while, but this week they unveiled a free tier …